Tyler Suiters                      

Hey everybody. With the Consumer Technology Association, I'm Tyler Suiters. We are the owners and producers of CES, the largest, the most influential tech event on the entire plant. Our big show is coming up in January, the 7th through the 10th, 2020, in Las Vegas. As always, our home away from home. And we are here to help you get CES ready. So, as the global event for tech innovation, CES is home to a myriad of game-changing technologies and verticals, right?

Tyler Suiters                      

You think of the content and entertainment sector, the auto sector, and then layer things on top of that like game-changing, 5G technology, or all the iterations of what AI can do for us. Today, we're focusing on a vertical you may not think of. That is sports technology. And CES really does provide the perfect arena for this. Because, on the tech side, the devices, the products, you have digitals and wearables and simulator technologies, the kinds of things that help you train like a professional athlete, if not always perform like one.

Tyler Suiters                      

Then, on the other side of the spectrum, the leaders in this space, the voices, the minds that are sharing how to reach audiences, sports fans, or sports sort-of-fans, whether they're at home, in the arena, or even out and about. Brilliant conversations take place. Today, two examples. And again, I'll use that notation of both ends of the spectrum. On the high side, we are talking to a leader from Formula 1 racing.

Tyler Suiters      

And if you don't know F1, it's a bit James Bond meets the technology sector. This is probably the most technologically advanced sport in the entire world. F1 has a global fan base. They go to exotic race locations, very cool road courses. But today, we're talking about how F1 is not just addressing fans there, at the race courses, but bringing the action and the excitement, and some of the driver information and car information, to fans all around the world. That conversation with F1 is coming up.

Tyler Suiters                      

Now, on the slightly smaller side, an insiders' take, and I would argue, an expert's take, on sports startups. Something that you don't always hear about. This is the way smaller companies are growing, and growing quickly. Thanks, in part, to things like data, analysis, and sharing, and the strategy that goes into that. And also, access, whether you're an athlete trying to break into a sport at a higher level, or someone in the business, trying to ascend. That's all coming up on this edition of CES Tech Talk.

Tyler Suiters                      

Joining us now is Murray Barnett, and he may have one of the coolest jobs in the international sports scene. He is with Formula 1, F1, where he is Head of Global Sponsorship and Commercial Partnerships. Murray, great to have you with us. And I don't know that there's any sport in the world that embraces global quite as much as you do at F1.

Murray Barnett                

Well, thank you for the great introduction. Yeah, we like to think of ourselves as the only truly global annual sporting theories. We cover 21 races this year, 22 races next year, which happen on all five continents. So delighted to be with you today to touch on some of our technology, and where we see the future of sports and technology going.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah. Well, it seems so right, Murray, in that, a sport like F1, with an audience that is scattered around the world, that proximity is difficult to achieve, in terms of actually getting to a race, depending on where you live. But through technology, you can get closer, not just to viewing the race itself, but in some senses, climb into the car with the drivers, right? Just because of the connectivity that's available now.

Murray Barnett                

100 percent. Actually, Formula 1, when you actually get down to the sport, is the most technologically advanced sport on the planet. Everything from seatbelt through to carbon fiber, through to refrigeration technology, that was developed with Formula 1 in mind. It now trickles through to people's everyday lives. But we're also taking that view about the way in which we engage with our fans around the world. You hit the right word there with connectivity.

Murray Barnett                

Because, it's everything from, how do we connect with our fans at the track, how do we connect the cars to the engineers? How do we connect to our fans, which are not coming to races? And our big challenge is, how do we put all of that together and transfer all of the data and pictures and video and other information that we have, to all of these constituent audiences to make sure that they ... If you're in a technical capacity, you're making the most informed decision. And if you're a fan of the sport, you are having the most enjoyable experience with all of the data that's available to us.

Tyler Suiters                      

So you at F1 have really put an emphasis, Murray, on being, to use a loose term, customer friendly. I would rephrase that as saying, making sure the fans are engaged and involved as much as possible. Again, that can be a challenge when cars are zipping by at incredible speeds on a circuitous route, that, if you're in person, see them only once every minute or so, if that. How are you emphasizing the consumer experience, the customer experience? Both, at the venues, where you're holding races, but also, everyone at home, as you said, emphasizing the pictures that we all see.

Murray Barnett                

Formula 1 was taken over by Liberty Media about three years ago. And part of Liberty's mantra when I joined the company was actually that, we have to put the fan at the center of everything that we do. So what we're trying to do is, really imagine the experience and what it's like for fans, whether they're at the track, or whether they're sitting on their couch, or whatever. And trying to make sure that we are creating both customized experiences, but also the best possible experience.

Murray Barnett                

We have everybody from data geeks, who want to know everything about how fast the car's going, how much it's accelerating, how regular lap times are, and all of those kinds of stats, right through to people that just want to see very high quality video. Actually, one of the things that we've done, certainly for those not at the track, is launched our over the top consumer product called F1 TV, which is available in the States and many other countries around the world, where you can choose your own camera angle, you can get additional data. Really, making it a customizable experience for the viewer, and making sure that they get exactly what they want when they want it.

Murray Barnett                

In terms of those at the track, we're working hard to try and figure out better ways to make it an enjoyable experience. Because, although people primarily come for the Formula 1 race, they tend to be at the track for sort of eight hours a day for a whole weekend. So, three days, eight hours a day, that 24 hours that we've got to actually occupy a fan's time, or that we have them available to enjoy stuff with us.

Murray Barnett                

So, it's important that we also make sure that we have apps and other technology for them to be able to know what's on where and be able to get the most out of their Grand Prix weekend when they're on site. And as you say, they don't necessarily always get to see a huge amount of the cars. So that's been a big part of it, is seeing how we can unfold as much of the technology and data that we have to the fan, so that they can have that truly enjoyable experience, and understand exactly what it is that they're seeing.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah. You bring up a really interesting point, Murray, and that is the fact that, either social media or platform-based media, the kind that's the lean-in experience, is a bit of an intersection for fans. I would say this in any sport, but it sounds especially true for F1, given the landscape that you've sketched, in that that's a point of connection, whether you are watching in real time, or you're six time zones away, trying to catch up on what happened overnight. Those are the platforms that you really can communicate across, perhaps most effectively.

Murray Barnett                

Yeah. What I find fascinating, and I'm lucky to have a focus group of two at home, in my nine-year-old and 12-year-old sons. The way that they consume Formula 1 being fans, and not just because of me, it's very different how I consume it. I don't think that they've ever sat down and watched anything for two hours in one go. They're still massive Formula 1 fans, but they're consuming it through Instagram, through YouTube clips, through seeking out information from their peers, through following the drivers on the podcasts that we produce, and various other ways of consuming it. And in many ways, they're much more lenient than I am, who's sitting on a couch at three o'clock on a Sunday afternoon, maybe after a glass of wine, who's maybe not watching it, as interestingly as them.

Murray Barnett                

I think, what we're finding is that, in order to attract these new generations and different generations, you have to create media and content for the platforms that they watch on. So what we find, and I think is true of all sports media companies at the moment, is that they're having to create a ton more content than they ever did before, in tons of different formats, very bespoke for each of the platforms that they're working for. We, in the last two years, have launched our own Esports league. We've launched our own Twitter and Instagram accounts, which unbelievably didn't exist until about two and a half, three years ago. We focus a lot—[crosstalk 00:10:10]

Tyler Suiters                      

You might need to repeat that. You didn't have social media platforms until just a few years ago at F1?

Murray Barnett                

Correct. When I joined three years ago, we had a sort of a dormant.com site that had some limited information on. No Instagram account, no Twitter handle, no Facebook. Because the previous ownership didn't believe in attracting those new generations. Actually, we see them both as, let's call it a customer acquisition tool or a fan acquisition tool. But also, eventually a way for us to make money. And what we're finding more and more is that, our partners want to be involved across all of those platforms, because they kind of attract different audiences.

Tyler Suiters                      

Use the euphemism of your choice, shaking your head, face in palm, however you want to phrase it. But coming from your background at ESPN, where you're trying to reach potential viewers at all times in all places, how do you go from, now I use a racing symbol? But from zero to 120 in 2016, when you had nothing and need to have everything.

Murray Barnett                

Well, my boss likes to say, he wasn't sure when he joined whether it was a startup or a turnaround. The answer is, it's probably somewhere in the middle. But the great advantage of that is, we were able to take best practices that we've seen from other leagues and indeed make our own carefully judged experiment. And I'd say that we're probably amongst the best in in the way that we use social and digital media now. The fan experience, if you're following up in those mediums, it's a very strong one.

Tyler Suiters                      

I don't want to lose sight of the fact that, as you said, this is most likely the most technologically advanced sport on the planet right now. Where are you seeing the advances from cutting-edge technology, whether it's AI or 5G connectivity? Let's stay away from self-driving vehicles for the time being. But what are the applications that are real game changers around the world, that you see making a difference in F1 right now?

Murray Barnett                

Yeah. It's interesting you bring up about the self-driving technology, because I think that's one of the beauties of Formula 1, is it's the perfect marriage of human endeavor and technological excellence. We very much want to keep that for the future, in terms of it being very much about putting that very human element with the most advanced technology.

Murray Barnett                

What people tend to see over at Formula 1 is, it's as kind of a solitary sport, because it's one driver driving a car. But if you speak to anybody inside a team, they'll tell you it really is a team sport because everybody has a role to follow, and everybody's supporting the activities that are behind the driver. Albeit that, he's the most visible. So, actually, our job is to try and work out the best ways in which we can provide them the best technology solutions to be able to understand what they're actually seeing coming off the car.

Murray Barnett                

We have 300 sensors on the car at the moment. We get 16 gigabytes of data for each car per second, and we're trying to figure out… Sorry, 15 gigabytes of data per car, per Grand Prix. We're trying to figure out the best way to make sure that that information passes back to the engineers and back to the factories, and back to all the people that are supporting the driver as quickly and efficiently as possible. So we definitely see the technology coming through, of 5G and so on. It's going to be a fantastic tool for Formula 1. And indeed, a fantastic proof of concept for providers of… If you can provide it on to a Formula 1 car going at 250 miles an hour around a track robustly, then surely you can manage with somebody's home network or providing it for their road-going vehicle.

Murray Barnett                

That's probably one of our biggest focuses. And in many ways, everything kind of spins off of that. So once you get the connectivity right, our ability to then connect to the fans. IOT is another big thing, which everybody's talking about at the moment. And that ultimately is still going to rely on that connectivity. I think, once we crack that 5G path and the way in which we can best get those connections up and running, we see that the possibilities are almost only limited by the imagination that we have as to where those could fit and how those could be utilized.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah. I'd like to circle back to something you said earlier, Murray, about the race weekend feel. Which can mean different things to different sports and in different continents. But for F1, you were saying roughly eight hours a day, three days of a weekend. And it's not just fans, right? We're talking about, the teams themselves, the media, the sponsors, the content and entertainment sector. Granted, my view is a bit myopic, but it sounds a bit like the mashup we get C Space at CES where, it's this confluence of people who are your audience, who are conduits to the audience, who are creating elements of entertainment that the audience wants to watch, all in one place at one time. The difference being, you're moving from country to country, continent to continent, depending on the weekend. Right?

Murray Barnett                

Yeah. It's both a blessing and a curse in the sense that, if you go to a soccer match or to NFL or anything like that, you're probably talking four or five hours maximum, maybe less even, in the case of a soccer match. People just come and go. We've got those people turning up for the same length of time, if not a bit longer, for the three days. In many ways it's much more akin to a music festival.

Murray Barnett                

And what we're trying to give people is very much that experience where, it's an entertainment weekend with motor racing at the core. So if you come to a Formula 1 weekend, you'll see that there's lots of experiential activities there. Esports are such a huge part of what we do as well, because it gives you that sort of first-person opportunity to experience roughly what it's like to be a Formula 1 car. And I've got a great idea that I want to tell you about in just a minute.

Murray Barnett                

Then there's also music, there's food and drink, fashion, all of these other elements, which make it a really fantastic, rounded weekend for the entire family. The analogy I always use is, I should be able to take my wife and kids to a Grand Prix weekend. And even if they don't see one moment of on-track action, they'll all come away having had an amazing experience. Again, to bring it back to technology, that's so essential in all aspects of us providing that great entertainment experience.

Tyler Suiters                      

All right. You provided a nice, what we call deep tease. Because I’ve got a great idea. Just wait for it. Break it out, please. Let's pull back the curtain and hear what you're saying, Murray.

Murray Barnett                

One idea that we're working on, and I should add that this is probably not something that's going to happen imminently, but we're super excited about the possibility of is, the idea that, through our video game, F1 2019, that you would be able to compete in real time against the drivers in any one race. Meaning that, you know, for a circuit that’s in the Americas in Austin and in November, you would be able to line up on the grid at the same time in front of your console with your own car, and you would be able to make real time decisions about when you had a pit stop, what kind of tires you put on, and all of that. And at the end of the race, you would know whether you had actually been able to have beaten the driver that won the Grand Prix.

Murray Barnett                

The reason why we think we're very close to doing that is, there's still a few seconds of latency between the data and the pictures. But the quality of the video game is getting very close to that. And we think that that's a very unique advantage that we have over something like Madden or NBA 2K, or so on, where you don't quite get that first-person experience, but we think it would be kind of neat to sit in your bedroom and realize at the end of the race that, actually, if you were really a racing driver, you would've come first, second, third, whatever it is. That's one of the kind of exciting technology projects that we're working toward.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah, let's limit it to second and third, because nobody beats Lewis Hamilton. To be honest about the state of play right now. Brilliant idea.

Murray Barnett                

[crosstalk 00:18:37] in a Ferrari. He's doing pretty well these days.

Tyler Suiters                      

A brilliant idea, Murray. It sounds like that's such a ripe application for, as I mentioned earlier, something like 5g connectivity, where you need it anytime, anywhere. But also, those lightning speeds with low, if no, latency, for augmented and virtual reality for a smart city. And for an immersive gaming experience. Are you in a sense that the technology sounds like it's there, it's the connectivity to some degree you need to catch up to bring this idea to reality?

Murray Barnett                

Yeah. I'm probably getting over my skis a little bit. There are certainly a couple of challenges. But connectivity remains something, as I kind of said earlier, it's so absolutely front and center of everything that we're thinking about going forward, and making sure that we have both the bandwidth and the speed required. Because, if we crack both of those issues, then we're able to do some really, really cool and different things.

Murray Barnett                

Our sport lends itself so well to being technology incubators and first uses of new technology. There's an insatiable appetite to use anything that comes on the market. When we come to somewhere like CES, it's as much for us to learn about work, how we see these other people developing and to get new ideas, as it is to showcase to companies the opportunities that exist with Formula 1.

Murray Barnett                

And increasingly, when we work with technology providers like, say, an Amazon Web Services, the relationship that we have with them, it's as much about trying to scope out what a shared vision for the future looks like, as it is about just using their products and services, or them being able to use Formula 1 as a test bed. We see everything that we do very much as building technology partnerships, and that's really where CES is just a great forum for us.

Tyler Suiters                      

Murray Barnett is Head of Global Sponsorship and Commercial Partnerships at Formula 1, F1, the racing circuit of the world. Murray, a real pleasure. I'm pleasantly surprised we were able to catch you between flights and trips and continents. Thanks so much for your time, and we'll see you in Vegas in a few months.

Murray Barnett                

Thank you very much for having me. Really appreciate it.

Tyler Suiters                      

Jill Stelfox is not only co-CEO at EDGY Inc, she is a true success story in the sports and tech sector. Jill, great to have you with us today. Thanks so much.

Jill Stelfox                           

Yeah, thanks for having me.

Tyler Suiters                      

So not unusual to hear from a successful entrepreneur and startup veteran who was in the San Francisco Bay area. I think what is a bit unusual is one, the amount of success you've had, but two, the fact that it has almost exclusively been in the sports sector. What is the key element of finding success and growth in sports and tech?

Jill Stelfox                           

Number one, I would say, creativity. And number two, persistence. Sticking with it for a while, I think, is absolutely key.

Tyler Suiters                      

All right. So it's not unusual to talk to a successful entrepreneur from the San Francisco Bay area, as you are. I think, what is a bit unusual is the fact that you have been in sports and technology for so long. What is the one key to success, or the few keys, that you think it takes for such longevity, such success at this nexus between technology and sports?

Jill Stelfox                           

I think it has a lot to do with creativity and persistence. Really understanding what teams and leagues are looking for, and sticking with technology and technology changes over time.

Tyler Suiters                      

Speaking of that change, what is the biggest leap in technology that you've seen, that has really driven the growth and the excitement in sports tech?

Jill Stelfox                           

I think, ultimately, the ability to deliver real time data, so that fans can use that data in everything from gaming to gambling. But it starts with a delivery of real time data.

Tyler Suiters                      

That is often—

Jill Stelfox                           

Otherwise, those [inaudible 00:23:08] wouldn't exist.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah, Jill. That's often, so often, described as some variation of, as Congressman Will Hurd puts it, "data being the coin of the realm." So I'm not surprised to hear that in the sports sector as well. When was that leap? When did you notice, or really begin to see the strong connection between availability and collection of data, and how it can drive success and ability as a company?

Jill Stelfox                           

In 2013, I worked with the NFL to deliver the first real time tracking system for the NFL, that was league-wide. And we were able to put RFID chips on every NFL player in the league and deliver data, see this in real time, 120 milliseconds, to television. And that was the first time that a league-wide rollout happened. And you literally, as a fan, could see that data and kind of understand the power of what was possible. And what's fascinating is, from 2013 to 2019 is, you now see companies that have been spun off to consume that data and use it for all kinds of things. To do player health and welfare, to do gambling, to do all kinds of fun things.

Tyler Suiters                      

Putting data aside for a second, let's talk about what you're doing now at EDGY Inc, where you're co-CEO, and what your game plan, so to speak, is there at EDGY?

Jill Stelfox                           

Yeah. What we do now is, we actually help companies, other companies, not just ours, but other companies, both sell and market their sport technologies to teams and leagues around the world. We really help amplify all kinds of technology companies in the market. What's great about that is, we can see cutting-edge technologies and what's going on today. And it's amazing. Like you said, it's amazing how fast technology changes and what's available. In 2013, we were the first with the NFL. And now, every major league around the world has a sports tracking system in place. Whether it's some kind of RFID or GPS or camera-based tracking. Every league has it. Every league has data where they can see [inaudible 00:25:57] distance of a player in the hands of fans. It's amazing.

Tyler Suiters                      

Given that scope of work at EDGY, Jill, what has you most excited? Is it about technology for fans? And I'll break that down to either at home watching, or online watching, or fans in the stadium. Is it about players? Is it about the team? Is it league marketing? I'll give you an out. You can also say, all of the above if you choose, and you can't pin down just one.

Jill Stelfox                           

I would say, maybe two things. One is, I'm a big fan, and always have been, from the early work that I did with the NFL on Player, having access to the data that they create. In the NFL, for example, players have Create the Data. They have access to it, for sure. But imagine the day when they can use that data to leverage it to create their own assets. I think that's just now starting. Imagine them using it to create their own advertising and generate their own revenue. I think, someday, that will happen, and there'll be whole companies spun out to create that for them. And that may be the new Wild, Wild West, in terms of revenue generation. And I think that would be awesome for them, because they create it. That'd be great.

Tyler Suiters                      

Is that a bit of an extension of, say, an athlete today has his or her own, I'll pick out Twitter feed, or maybe their Insta handle. But that that profile is their brand, essentially, to fans. You're talking about extrapolating that beyond just words and pictures and content, into something much more objective and scientific, it seems.

Jill Stelfox                           

Yes. How fun would that be? Right? I can see you where there would be a day where, a player would have the ability to put their stats out themselves, about how fast they ran in a particular play, and maybe call the opposing player out and say, "Look, I beat you, and here's how fast I ran." How fun would that be?

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah, I think you just gave OBJ his next idea for [inaudible 00:28:29] defensive backs in the NFL. That actually is an exciting future for fans. We've talked a lot about the pro leagues, Jill, but you have experienced, as well, at a former company, ROUTE Inc., that dealt with the application of technology and data for high school athletes. Delve into that a bit, if you would, please.

Jill Stelfox                           

Yeah. This is one of my favorite companies. It's a company called ROUTE Analytics. They have this great application. If you are a high school athlete, a high school football player today, and they're working on other areas. And you want to know how do you get a D1, D2 scholarship. What's the right football program for you? You are used to this defense setup, or this or offensive setup. You're this type of player in this organization. What colleges operate like that, have most importantly, this kind of education system, and where are you going to fit?

Jill Stelfox                           

Large college, small college, great coach. Where's the right place for you? Great CEO there, Craig. He has absolutely built this company from a college coach scout perspective and given a real view for high school athletes that may not be scouted in the same way that some of the well-known high schools are scouted. And you can upload tapes or video, and play information, and all kinds of stuff, and make yourself known to colleges.

Jill Stelfox                           

And what's awesome about this is, this company has been around for a couple of years, and they've got great statistics about kids making it into D1 and D2 schools on scholarship using this ROUTE product. It's a pretty cool outcome, and I'm absolutely proud of these guys that have put it together. Craig, the CEO of the company, he did it because his son is a football player and needed to go to… needed to find the right college that would fit for his son. And he pulled it off. And then he made a company out of it, which is awesome.

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah. I could see how pride is a clear factor in that, Jill. Shifting a little bit, I'd like to talk about your role. You're currently Chair of Women in Sports Tech. WIST, I think, is the nomenclature around the business. I don't want to make too ham-handed a comparison here, but it's a little like ROUTE in that, you're driving toward outcomes and trying to get deserving, talented people in the field noticed and get them opportunities. Unlike ROUTE, where you have a really short horizon on proving value. Women in sports tech has a bit of a longer view. Where is the spectrum right now, and where do you want to see it go?

Jill Stelfox                           

We are so excited about women in sports tech. We put together a bunch of wonderful women and enthusiastic men, put women in sports tech together, because we found that there were not enough women in the sports tech community, at the senior level. And we went out and did a international survey of women, and asked, why is this the case?

Jill Stelfox                           

One of the big reasons is that, young women needed to see examples and role models. So we created a foundation so that we could show other women examples. And so we do a number of things in order to do that. One of them, by the way, is making sure that we have enough fabulous women that are involved in sports technology on panels at CES. And it's one of the things we're most proud of. Last year at CES, by the way, that was an amazing all-female panel of female technologists at CES for the first time ever, which was really cool, around sports. And there's women across all of the sports technology panels, which is great, at CES.

Jill Stelfox                           

So we make sure that women have an opportunity to be seen and heard in public events. We do a lot of mentoring, and then we actually sponsor and pay for fellowships for great young college women in the field of sports technology, and kickstart their careers. So they've got resume building opportunities, and it's amazing what's possible once you give them a shot. Off they go.

Tyler Suiters                      

Jill, first of all, you sound like a head football coach I once had, and that's a compliment. Final question, as a, I'll say CES veteran, and you can choose whether to reveal how many CES you have been to in years past. But obviously, the footprint of the show has changed, the makeup of the show has changed, the technologies on display have changed. Can you just trace a journey based on your own history about sports at CES and where it stands today?

Jill Stelfox                           

I have been coming to CES for so long that, I came before there were sports, even as a subset of CES. And then, when it was a small piece of the story, to now… It was like half of a room. Now, it's a whole section in a whole building. I remember when we got part of the program, which is funny, because now we've got a whole show. So it's sort of great to see how it's grown. And even, frankly, the sports technology field. I remember when sports tech was really just television, as a part of the sports game. It's something that we joke about all the time. If you look back on some of the old basketball games, or the old football games, there's no score in the corner of the television. [crosstalk:00:35:29]

Tyler Suiters                      

Yeah, clean screen. Yeah.

Jill Stelfox                           

Yeah. It's like, how do you even know what's going on?

Tyler Suiters                      

You sat around and waited for the score to flash. Yeah.

Jill Stelfox                           

Yeah. It's crazy. [inaudible 00:35:41]

Tyler Suiters                      

Jill, before we let you go, you made a number of NFL references. Safe to assume your team in the league is the Niners?

Jill Stelfox                           

I'll tell you a funny thing. My team in the league is the Saints. I am a huge Sean Payton, Drew Brees fan. Huge. Yeah.

Tyler Suiters                      

All right. Well, you've got one Superbowl victory to your credit, and we'll see what 2019 holds. Maybe we'll be celebrating another playoff experience at CES 2020 for your Saints.

Jill Stelfox                           

I'm hoping.

Tyler Suiters                      

Jill Stelfox is not only an outstanding sports fan, but also co-CEO at EDGY, and Chair of the Board at Women in Sports Tech. Jill, it has been a blast. Let's keep this conversation going, please.

Jill Stelfox                           

Great.

Tyler Suiters                      

All right. Coming up next time on CES Tech Talk, vehicle technology. Now, hold on. Yes, it's self-driving vehicles, and yes, we have some brilliant automobiles and concept cars, and some pretty wild and imaginative and innovative outliers at the space at CES. But we're talking to two companies, major companies, you'll recognize the brand names, about their role in vehicle technology. One is a company on the agricultural side, so think field. The other is, firmly planted, or better way to put it is, firmly floating, on the water.

Tyler Suiters                      

All right, that's all. Next time on CES Tech Talk. We are here to help you get CES ready for 2020. So to get prepped up for the big show, subscribe to this podcast and you won't miss a single episode, not a single topic we are analyzing and delving deeply into, as we get ready for CES 2020. The show dates, January 7th through the 10th, in Las Vegas. The information you need to plan your way is at ces.tech. As always, none of this is possible without our true podcasting superstars, our executive producer, Tina Anthony, and our senior studio engineer, John Lindsey. You all are the best in the business. I'm Tyler Suiters. Let's talk tech again soon.

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