Natalie Novak 

Welcome back to see space. Hi guys my name is Natalie Novak and I'm an agent at UTA and I'm one of the MCs for the storyteller stage this week. This next session we will be discussing how some innovative brands are using technology to shape culture, engage with today's consumer, and inspire the next generation of women in tech.

 
Natalie Novak 

Please welcome to the stage. Jenna Blaha, Technology Editor of Elle who is moderating the session along with panelists, Claudine Cazian, Director of Partnerships at Instagram for Entertainment, Music and Sports. JJ Davis, Chief Communications Officer of Dell, Jasmine Crowe Founder and CEO of Goodr and Dustee Jenkins, Global Head of Communications at Spotify. Welcome, ladies.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Thank you, Natalie, for the introduction. Hi, everyone. Thank you for being here. I am Jenna Blaha, the technology editor of Elle magazine. I'm thrilled to be here with these incredible women who just happened to be in technology. We're going to be talking about how storytelling and technology is really shaping business and driving impact. And I think the best way to start is just to turn the mic over to each of you to tell us a bit about who you are, what it is that you do so we have some context to the conversation. Claudine?

 
Claudine Cazian 

Hi, everybody. Thanks for being here today. My name is Claudine Cazian. And I oversee entertainment, music and sports partnerships for Instagram. And so what that means is, we want to make sure that every time you open up the Instagram app, you see that as a living, breathing ecosystem, where the biggest people and the biggest moments in the world are all happening on our platform. So I feel very blessed to be at Instagram and doing partnerships worldwide. Thank you.

 
JJ Davis 

Excellent. I'm JJ Davis with Dell Technologies. I am the Chief Communications Officer. And really, at the end of the day, my team every day, looks to protect and enhance the Dell brand and so how do we marry purpose and profit and really think about the important role technology plays to drive human progress.

 
Jasmine Crowe 

Good afternoon, everyone. My name is Jasmine Crowe. I'm the founder and CEO of Goodr. We are a startup that is focused on solving hunger. So we are leveraging technology to combat food waste and get excess food to people instead of to landfills.

 
Dustee Jenkins 

And hello out there. I'm Dustee Jenkins. I am Global Communications Head for Spotify. So I have the pleasure of telling Spotify story every day in the 79 markets around the world where we do business.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Amazing. Thank you so much for sharing. I know we have so much to talk about and always so little time. So I'll jump right in Claudine. Welcome back to the Elle stage.

 
Claudine Cazian 

Thank you for having me.

 
Jenna Blaha 

You were with us last year. Let's get us caught up on some of the Instagram tools that are really impacting the community today.

 
Claudine Cazian 

Absolutely. The two newest tools on Instagram that we have right now are igtv and shopping. So on the IGTV front, some things that people need to know- the products been out about 18 months but we're still getting people used to it and figuring out how to use it and we've got so much great organic growth year over year that we're really proud of. It's a way to do deeper storytelling. It's a way to allow people to learn more about who you are in the many seasons of your life, whether you're a public figure, or whether you're a brand or a business. Perfect example of that would be someone like Jennifer Garner, right? Or Serena Williams. So, you know, when you scrolled through Instagram, and you engaged with her Instagram feed or Instagram stories, you got a great look into her life. And the periphery of it showed you that she was a big fan of cooking, right? But with IGTV we're able to do deeper storytelling and she now hosts a pretend cooking show. I don't know if anybody here in the audience has seen it. It's contrary to the title. It is a legit cooking show that she does on her IGTV channel in which she cooks awesome recipes, but it's a way for her to engage and show a different side of her personality that you wouldn't normally see. Yeah, and we're really excited about it.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Are you seeing any brand or any person that's really using some of those tools for driving change, you know, moving the masses and really having a real world impact?

 
Claudine Cazian 

Yeah, absolutely. I would think that the the most timely and topical one right now, actually two, Michelle Obama announced that she's going to be doing an igtv series dedicated to teaching kids about college and getting into college and I think that's fantastic. And that just dropped today. But Celeste Barber who is a comedian out of Australia has raised almost $30 million between Instagram and Facebook tools for the Australian bush bush fires that we've all heard about and through Instagram feed stories, live and igtv she's able to give us a to galvanize her community and educate and you know, 30 million plus dollars in five days is she is by far the highest fundraiser ever Facebook.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Amazing. JJ I know, too, that Dell has such a rich history of supporting women entrepreneurs, and you've been involved in some of those programs. From your perspective, how has the conversation around women in technology evolved over the years?

 
JJ Davis 

Yeah. And when we started the Dell Women's Entrepreneur network back in 2010, it was right after the recession. And what we saw happening was small businesses were not able to take advantage of their traditional lines of credit that they once had, because of the banks kind of tampering down and women were more adversely impacted than men not having access to the capital that they had had previously. And Dell Financial Services is a lending arm that we have that funds technology purchases. And so we wanted to focus in on women entrepreneurs around the world to give them access to capital networks and technology to really grow their companies to make it to five or $10 million and beyond. And back then we were criticized early on for having too many men in the conversation? Can't you find enough women in tech to be on a stage like this? Why are there men from Dell in the audience? Don't you have a female engineer you could have up there talking about that. And yes, we do. But now 10 years later, men are right there at the forefront of the conversation, because if the men and power aren't involved and giving people like Jasmine, access to the capital and technology and networks she needs, she might not make it to where she wants to be as a small business owner. And so I think now through programs like men advocating for real change, which we now call Mini, and looking at unconscious bias in the workplace, and how do you create truly inclusive work environments, whether it's for entrepreneurs or in big companies like all of ours, men have to be in the conversation and I think in the last 10 years, that's maybe been the biggest shift.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Well, you know, it's interesting, I like to think that we're having this conversation about women in technology, not just is for women, but for all people everywhere. Yeah, it really is a community. So, you know, and I think that the definition itself of a woman in technology has shifted and then redefined Jasmine as a woman who's found herself in technology. I would love to hear from your perspective really on how storytelling and technology is driving your business. Definitely.

 
Jasmine Crowe 

I really think back to really how I got started with Goodr and it was very organic. I mean, JJ me you're just talking about this over lunch, I was feeding people that were experiencing homelessness out of my kitchen. And I was doing that for about a good three and a half years creating these pop up restaurants. And I would take them underneath the bridges and parking lots and alleyways. And I would print out menus and allow people that were experiencing homelessness to dine with dignity. And so when I saw that there was a real opportunity to connect the over 80 billion pounds of food that we waste every year with the 40 million people that are hungry. It was totally storytelling that got me on the path when I started talking to investors, and even talking to customers, it was telling my story and the fact that I started in my kitchen. I started very organically, I never imagined that I would even be in tech, you know, I was in the nonprofit world. But I saw that technology was doing so many things. I looked at how many apps we had created to get food faster to people like us, right? So your UberEats, your Postmates, Doordash. But what had we created to get food to people who just didn't know where their next meal was coming from period. And so a lot of that storytelling, I think, helped me bridge the gap into technology. And it actually, when I was talking to a lot of investors, it helped me connect them to the experience that I was trying to solve the problem. Because, to be honest, a lot of them weren't homeless. They hadn't been hungry. They didn't know about food waste. So my only advantage was to tell them my story, and to tell them the story of what our technology was going to do to change it.

 
Jenna Blaha 

In the work you're doing is just so very important. And it's such an inspiration. Dustee, I know too we were talking about this, you never expected to find yourself as a woman in technology. You never said it out to have that as your mission. But here you are. How did you find your way through technology? And how are you seeing some of the women also find their way at a company like Spotify?

 
Dustee Jenkins 

Like many of the prestigious women on the stage, Jenna and even yourself when we were talking about this, as as a young person, my mom worked, and she owned an engineering firm, and I knew she was successful. And so I never said, I want to be a successful woman. I just wanted to be successful. And I didn't understand the barriers that she was up against in a field like engineering, which was dominated by males. And so as I progress throughout my career, I found that if I didn't allow doubt to creep in, if I didn't allow anyone to set limitations on me, I would just go for it. And so when I started talking to Daniel ack about their role at Spotify as Global Head of comms, of course, I knew tech was a different sector then target retail, which I had been in. But I know comms and I trusted myself. And so I think more and more, we cannot let our own our own selves, our own inner voices set those limitations, we just have to go for it. And all along the way, I felt like in every role be at university, I was really happy what I was what I was doing. But there was like this inner little voice that said, keep going, keep going. And I'd like to think that that's because of my mom and the standard that she set for me as a young person. And as a daughter. I have a daughter. So I really think about that. But one of the things I will say is, we have to be intentional about helping other women, men and women alike, because the numbers and I can share the numbers and music. They're staggering. And there's it's still not 50/50 and it's not anywhere close. And so we have to be intentional about supporting women, creating advocacy, being there for other women sharing conversations like this one, we have to be intentional. Yeah, and

 
Jenna Blaha 

I think the transparency around the conversation and what it takes to get things done and, and mentorship, right. I think that that's what we're really talking about. I want to talk about some news claudin. As a technology editor, I'm getting a lot of questions about disappearing likes on Instagram, a lot of anxiety. And I know that Instagram launched a global test of the privatization of likes. Yeah. We'll talk about it. Let's talk about it. In the months ahead.

 
Claudine Cazian 

Yeah, look, so Instagram right now is doing a global test in which we are privatizing. Like some of you may be in that test right now. And I want to make sure to be clear about it because people are like, are you taking away likes? And the answer's no, what it is, is if you share something on Instagram, only you will be able to see how many likes you get. So we are privatizing likes, we're not taking them away. And so that is a global test that we are in now. It is something that we are gathering feedback on which has been largely positive and it will be able to share more on it soon. The reason we're doing It is because we want to be able to create and test the ability to share content in real time, but minus the pressure. You know, I think when, you know, several years ago, when Instagram was founded, and the light was created, it's actually a very sweet story when the founders, you know, shared the story of how they created the light. I don't think any of us could have understood the global scale that it would take. Or we could have known at the time. What that would that symbol would come to mean to some people, specifically young people. So I'm really proud of us as a company for taking a step back reevaluating, see how it impacts the ecosystem and then make a decision from there. But so far, the the results and the feedback has been great and will be privatizing.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Yes, yes. So now,

 
Claudine Cazian 

We will be able to share more soon once we once we get through that test.

 
Jenna Blaha 

That's great. And I think it's really so refreshing that a company as big as Instagram that has such a real impact on people and the Know How many times do we use Instagram a day is really taking a stance and trying something out, you know, the times change and we have to evolve with it. JJ, I know that scaling impact is very important to Dell, and especially this year in the years to come, I want to talk specifically about sustainability. I know it's a topic on so many of our minds, we're seeing, you know, the news on Instagram, about the wildfires, and we're seeing people get involved. But Dell has really had so many green initiatives for so long. Can you walk us through some of those and then talk about what the future holds for some of those programs?

 
JJ Davis 

Absolutely. When you think about sustainability, it has to be built into the core of your business. And so we talk about closed loop recycling or circular economy, where a lot of our leaders just say, Well, this is the way we do business. And if you're going to scale more sustainable products or packaging, you have to find a way to do it at the same or less cost than what is maybe the most popular Traditional packaging in the market. And so if you take packaging of our systems as an example, over the last couple of decades, we have moved beyond corrugated cardboard to wheat straw or bamboo or mushroom packaging. We helped start the next way, which is a consortium, our competitors are part of it, where we actually have started an ocean plastics supply chain, because it's not enough from a marketing perspective to have an ocean plastics product that is available at limited quantities. But how do you build a supply chain that is large and scalable, where you can make these materials sustainable? And so we started with our XPS 13 packaging, with just a single tray made from 25% recycled ocean plastics. And now that same product is shipped in a fully recyclable box but it's highly fashionable. It's a premium product. It's now packaging you're proud to display in your home or office alongside the laptop that came inside of it. And it is now core to that customer experience. So how do you make sustainability and a premium experience synonymous in one in the same and not compromise anything. And that's what companies are ultimately going to have to do by putting sustainability at the core. Just really quickly, we announced our 2030 goals of what we're going to drive as a company over the next 10 years. And we have said, for every product we sell, we will recycle or reuse a like product. All of our packaging will be 100% recyclable or reusable, and 50% of the contents that go in all our products, and that's from laptops to servers to storage arrays will be made from recycled or renewable content. And frankly, that 50% or more than half goal is so big that we don't know right now how we're going to get there. But we needed to tell the world probably through Instagram, that this was the steak we were going to put in the ground and it's what you need to hold us accountable for and that's what we're going to work toward

 
Jenna Blaha 

I love that. Isn't that amazing? I, I've been following Dell's initiatives for a while in this space. And I remember hearing about the recycling program where you're taking the computers and recycling the precious metals. Yes to jewelry designers, you had the Nikki Reed collaboration? Are you seeing collaboration as a big part of how you're going to get there to those goals? Or what are some of the things that you're going to need to do in order to make those very ambitious goals?

 
JJ Davis 

Yeah, I mean, when we had the Dell technology summit in November in Austin, and we announced these goals, we had an ongoing conversation about we can't do it alone and you have to embrace competition in the area of sustainability or in diversity. You know, we were just talking jasmine and I over lunch. And if you think about our commitment to women entrepreneurs, the most important thing a big company can do for a small company is be their first customer. So American Express referred Jasmine to us. That's how we met her. Now she and I are talking about how do we extend that Sustainability commitment to food waste, and what are we doing in our own cafeterias? And how can she maybe help us? And so the first thing I'm going to do when I get home is introduce her to the head of procurement at Dell to try to extend our sustainability commitment beyond what we're already doing, but to partner with her. So collaborations come in all forms, whether it's with traditional suppliers, or even competitors, or in partnership with entrepreneurs like Jasmine, its key or we won't save the planet. One company can't do it by themselves.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Absolutely. I think that's so refreshing. Jasmine, it sounds like you've got some really incredible partners that you're working with.

 
Jasmine Crowe 

Yeah, it was a good lunch.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Well, I think that with the mission, that you have to really have such a significant impact, if we're talking about impact, I mean, to provide meals for people who are hungry. It's such incredible work that I'm sure you see the impact every single day. Or there's some moments that you remember that you We'll keep near to your heart in the years to come and that have really kept you motivated.

 
Jasmine Crowe 

Oh god, there's so many you know, I think the biggest thing that I want to get a point get across to everyone today is that we really have a big difference in this country between access to food and access to Mills. And so I tell this story often about me personally volunteering in a food bank, and putting together these boxes of food for about 100 families that were in line. And in that box there were you know, a bag of kettle potato chips weightwatchers ding dongs, which is not right, you know, the crispy fried green onions that go on top of like a green bean casserole, a gallon of barbecue sauce, some superhero shaped macaroni noodles, a small mini can of corn, a can of refried beans, and a canopies. And that was it. You know, we had about 100 families waiting for that and the whole time I'm putting this food together, feeling like I'm doing good feeling like I'm Fighting hunger. I'm thinking to myself, what are these people can eat. And I think that's what we need to start thinking about what we're trying to do it good or is actually get people Mills. And so when we go in, and we partner with companies like Dell or we partner with American Express, and we're going to their corporate kitchens where there are CEOs and leaders on their C suite that are making into seven figures, the food that they eat in the food, that we're now have the ability to get to a shelter or to a veteran's home. It's so good. And so what we begin to do over that time is not only do we provide people to have actual real meals, we introduced them to more balanced and healthier nutrition. We're actually helping them you know, see the value that tell JJ distorted damageable when I first was delivering food, one guy was like, you know, you're trying to kill me. And I was like, sir, it's just asparagus he had never seen who never seen a vegetable that was out of a can. And so those moments always stick with me and you know, as we've been able to provide over 2 million pounds of food that we've diverted from landfills just in aliana alone. The the excitement of the food that we're bringing for people that are living on that marginal poverty line. When are we going to get more butternut squash that count kale was so amazing. We've begun to change outcomes for people. And when you give people better food, they feel better. I always think about the Snickers commercial. It was a big Superbowl hit a few years ago, you're not yourself when you're hungry. And I go back to think about how many people in this country children included over 14 million having a realize their full potential just because they're hungry. And you think about all the food that we waste in this country. And as you really go about your day, I'm the worst person to go out to lunch or dinner with because you don't want to waste your food. But we waste so much food. I mean, think of all the buses in Vegas that are going to throw away thousands of pounds of food tonight and how many people are hungry, right downtown and sleeping under bridges. We have a real problem in this country. And I think I'm just excited about the opportunity more rapid teacher of what good or will do and we have so much more was telling JJ today we have nonprofits that are registered in 42 states and 17 countries. So we have a huge need of food and the supply is still low, because people are still so afraid to do the right thing. You know, there's always that fear of like, Oh, well, what if someone gets sick, but at the same time, if you and I go to the grocery store tonight at 959, that deli will sell us a whole rotisserie chicken at 10 o'clock, they throw it away. And so what changed in a minute, that makes that food no longer good enough to give to somebody? And so the the things that I'm most proud about is the fact that I just took the first step, you know, I didn't think I'd be in technology. This wasn't my background. A lot of people told me this would not work. As a woman and as a woman of color was extremely hard to raise funding. I heard no so many times. And it was only when I heard Yes, once that I thought this could potentially work. And I'm just happy I didn't get defeated. I think that's that's the thing that I get give myself the most credit for is the fact that I'm really working on their problem, despite all the obstacles that are in my way.

 
Jenna Blaha 

And also that you didn't stop there, you keep iterating on what you do to get better and better and to build the nutritional information building

 
Jasmine Crowe 

Technology, giving people recipe cards, yeah, bringing chefs out so that when we recover things like artichokes or asparagus that people have never had before, right, we could teach them how to make a spinach and artichoke dip. We could teach them how to, you know, saute, asparagus, or how to roast it. And those things change lives for a lot of people. Yeah, I think iteration is everything. We're trying to now introduce sensor technology, so we can measure food safety and transit. So that that that fear now gets wiped away from all the businesses that are like, well, we can donate food if people get sick. And we say, hey, we'll ensure that it's arriving at temperature and you'll be able to track it within our app. Now we start ready to kind of solve for those problems.

 
Jenna Blaha 

And how many communities are you in now and

 
Jasmine Crowe 

We're in 7 markets right now. And our goal is to be in 20.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Okay

 
Jasmine Crowe 

By end of the year.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Do you have some in mind?

 
Jasmine Crowe 

Yeah, I mean, Vegas is a big one for me because there's just a lot of them here like we can end hunger in Vegas off of the buffets alone. And the food is so good, you know, really want to get to San Francisco. It's a big one for us. Los Angeles County is huge. New York City is a bro one we're really trying to get through Texas. So looking at Austin, looking at Houston and looking at Dallas, Portland, and Seattle. So those are like the big ones for us this year. Those are my goals.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Amazing. Yeah. Dustee, I know that for you and for Spotify. It's also very important to be involved in conversations of our time. What are some of the programs that you're really excited about at Spotify? And how do you tackle issues that you're discovering along the way?

 
Dustee Jenkins 

Yeah, at Spotify, it's a fun place to be right now. We have 250 million users around Twitter and 50 million users around the world. And so the platform is changing. Its growing. We've recently announced In the last year, we've done a lot in the space of podcasting. And so we acquired two complete companies gimlet and anchor I'm sure you've heard about them. And what we're seeing with podcasts overall, the the platform is just exploding. I don't know how many in the audience, raise your hand if you've listened to a podcast in the last six or nine months. Look at that. So that I mean, that's what's happening. And so we give quarterly earnings as every company does. And in our last earnings call, we shared that our consumption of podcasts was up 39%, quarter over quarter. And so the growth there is just incredible. And it's a great storytelling platform. And one of the things that we're hoping to be able to tackle is really this notion of gender parity across the platform, both with female and male artists, as well as podcasters. And so the great thing about podcast today is you don't have to be a celebrity. You don't have to be a professional. Really, anyone can have one and one of the companies we acquired as a company called anchor that is all about DIY podcasting. And so it can help anyone, anywhere create a podcast. And it's it's actually a pretty simple process. And it's wonderful to see the stories that are being told through platforms like Spotify,

 
Jenna Blaha 

so amazing. And just in terms of outside of podcast, too. I know that Spotify has gotten very involved. I think that there was a situation with Martina McBride got mistaken and the example of how you reacted to something that was unknown. I'd love for you to share the story.

 
Dustee Jenkins 

Yeah, to catch the audience up a little bit. And so if you look at the stats around females in the music industry overall, it's it's quite shocking. And so I brought it with me just so I would have it so of the total artists 22% are female 22% so of artists out there almost 80% are male of producers in the music industry. 2% 2% are female. So 98% male songwriters is 12%. And so when we look at those numbers as a company for years and years, we've said This is unacceptable. It's unacceptable. What can we do? And we've tried a number of initiatives. And I'm going to share a story with you as a PR person that you don't like to share, because it doesn't necessarily put Spotify in the best light. But I like to think it's what we did after that matters far more. And so Martina McBride is a well known female country artist, and she went to make a playlist of country music. And if you look at what happened through the story, she tweeted about it. The first couple of tries when she went to search for artists to make this playlist returned all males, and not once, not twice, but multiple times. And so she went to Twitter to say what is going on Spotify? This is not okay. And so when we saw this story, it was like a punch in the gut because we were really as a company trying to work on doing something about this. And so we dug into why. And so we started first with the data because we are a tech company. So we started with what's going on with another What's happening with the algorithm on the backend that's causing this. And many of you in the audience have probably heard a little something about algorithmic bias. And so of the 3000 playlists of the playlist on the platform 3000 are created by Spotify. There are 3 billion playlists. And so what was happening is people were playlisting more males. Again, not surprising, given the stats that I just gave you about how many more male artists there are. So if you're playlisting, more males, if you're listening to more male artists, the algorithm is going to return you male recommendations. And so we have to figure out how we go in and unbiased our algorithm. So that's definitely one step we're taking as a company. The second one is how do we promote more females. And so rather than shying away from this conversation, we decided to lean into it as we went to Nashville. And we said, Let's have a talk. Let's have a talk with the industry. And we invited the label heads we invited artists, and we talked very frankly about the numbers in country Music, the releases this year of female artist 14%. So of all the music released in country 14% were females. And yet a third of our marketing dollars went to female artists. And so we're doing our best to try to bring parody to it. But it's going to take more than Spotify. And so I'm really proud of the fact that we didn't shy away from the conversation, we really leaned into it.

 
Jenna Blaha 

I think that that's becoming or it should become the new norm, you know, people and brands getting behind these big causes and doing it collaboratively. None of us can get anything done if we're in a vacuum. So opening the doors, those conversations. Well, as we wind down I want to make sure that we're leaving everyone with some takeaways. Claudine, I'm sure this question gets very old for you, but it never gets old for us. That's okay. We all want to know tips and tricks for how to best use Instagram today. What should I be doing and thinking about

 
Claudine Cazian 

of course, and I'm always happy to answer the question because look, we are we are, like I said before a living breathing ecosystem. That's constant stantly iterating and evolving so I welcome the question anytime. So if I would say if I had to give you guys this is a quick snapshot, the way we think about Instagram is in services. So there are a multitude of services that you can engage with on an instant Instagram. And our goal is to connect you with the people and the things that you love ultimately. So you've got Instagram feed, you have Instagram stories, you've got Instagram Live igtv. And now shopping. And so my biggest advice is to be utilizing all the different surfaces of Instagram, whether you're a public figure, or whether you're a business or a brand, whatever you may be, make sure you're using all of the different surfaces. We talked a little bit about collaboration today and how important that is. And so how many of you have ever driven on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles? So you know, it's like an eight lane highway to probably be by nine by the time we get back, okay to Los Angeles. But think about your content strategy as the 405 freeway. You want to make sure that you're calling collaborating and playing in a lot of different lanes. So whether that's collaborating with different artists or different businesses or different companies or other female and male entrepreneurs, you want to make sure that collaboration is really consistent in your content strategy. Video is really, really important. We're seeing huge video growth, huge rates and consumption year over year so videos got to be part of your strategy. Keep the content tight, keep it bright, start with the action moment. my six year old over the holiday, I think it was telling you about this was I was trying to show her some old, like holiday movies that I grew up with, and you know, between the long sweeping intros and the music in the lead up by the first minute, she's like, Mommy, I'm bored.

 
Claudine Cazian 

Like really that fast? And it's just a constant reminder that you've got to just keep keep those hits coming and start with the with the action. But ultimately, your voice is the most important thing and all the women on this stage and all the companies here represented have an authentic voice. And finding your voice is really important whether again, you're a person or a brand, knowing what you stand for staying consistent on it. being authentic and sharing on Instagram, all the many seasons and layers of your life, whatever that may be. I think Serena Williams is a perfect example of that. You see her as a tennis star, a mom and entrepreneur. She shares her favorite Galaga Rita recipes on her Instagram, you know, it's like they're good, by the way. But just sharing all the many ways. Yeah. consistently, consistently. So authenticity, transparency, consistency. Yes, it all matters. Keep it action packed. Yes.

 
Jenna Blaha 

All right, JJ, for those of us working within a corporate structure, how can we be connecting with consumers? How can we be making a difference? How should we be approaching even female leadership internally?

 
JJ Davis 

First, before we get to that, I have to say we moved away briefly for about a year as my oldest son was entering High School. I don't think if it if it hadn't been for Instagram that he would have made it through that time because he woke up every morning checked his feed of what his friends back in Austin were doing. And so as much criticism as social media gets, it does create a community that complements our day to day lives, and I think helps kids especially but all of us feel connected to something even when we're going through some of our toughest times. And I think, for me, personally, I've experienced that through my kids, but then through work and business, we talk a lot about how do you really engage your audience and talk to them about things where they are. And so Instagram is a great platform to be able to do that. And so if you even look at our press conference from this morning, we announced new products, we announced concepts that may never come to market, but the president of our PC business spent maybe the most stage time that he had talking about social impact and those sustainability and diversity and privacy goals that we've set, because that's our responsibility. And for our customers, we have to sell things, we have to make quality products and services that people want to buy. And that has to really dominate the investment that we make. But increasingly, we have to help our customers understand not just what we do, but who we are as a brand and what we believe in and how do we connect corporate activism to what we need to do to drive the top and bottom line. And so it's finding that intersection? And how do you engage and give people those multiple layers and views into your company and be really vulnerable and transparent at the same time, just like me saying, We don't know how we're going to get to 50% recyclability in our products. But we're telling you that we will and we want you to hold us accountable. So I think that's a big piece that we have to start to get comfortable with is brands and Michael Dell signed on to the Business Roundtable purpose statement around along with 170 others CEOs saying, Now we care about stakeholder value, not just shareholder value and the game has changed, the CEO agenda will never be the same. And it's probably more important now in the world we live in than ever before.

 
Claudine Cazian 

I love setting the lofty goals right and creating a culture that makes it okay we have a saying an Instagram internally, like hit to miss to hit your goals, Miss two of your goals. And if you're hitting all of your goals, you're not doing enough. Right. So that's,

 
Jenna Blaha 

that's fantastic. Let's talk about goals. I think that there was some really great 2030 goals around fostering female leadership and mentorship. What are some of those?

 
JJ Davis 

So I'll tell you guys kind of when we came to the goal, one of the moon shots is that by 2030 50% of our employees will be women around the world, and 40% of our leaders will be women. And when we started that, they said they we the company, the team working on this, we set the initial goal at 40%. And we asked the question of will why is that very good. If 50% of the population are women. Why aren't we just going to say 50% of the our employees are going to be women? It was like, Oh, well, because the data and the algorithms we ran to get and project out what our employee population might look like in 10 years, the data told us, like 38%. And so that's what a moonshot is. And right now, the pipeline to get to 50% women and 40% women leaders isn't there. We set a goal of 25% of us employees would be African American, or Latino and 15% of leaders would be African American or Latino. We also have published a diversity report like I'm sure the other companies on the stage have as well, so that you can see where we are today and how far we have to go. And the work that we need to do to work harder and be very purposeful in going and looking for that diverse talent. If we're going to bring all of you and our customers the innovation that you're looking for.

 
Jenna Blaha 

It's amazing. Yeah, Jasmine for all those entrepreneurs out there, trying to make it any advice to them in terms of How do you get from idea and concept to really doing the work? Yeah, I mean,

 
Jasmine Crowe 

I always share something that my grandmother always used to tell me. And that was playing your work, and then work your plan. And so I think so much of it is just vision, you know, like, really, what do you, man, what are you trying to manifest? And what is the ultimate vision? And I used to say, like, I really want to end hunger, and people would say, Oh, that's so crazy. That's so ambitious. But who's to say that it can be done, you know? And so I think what you think about and like what you keeping your mind really does happen. And I believe, I always tell myself, and I think other entrepreneurs should tell themselves, like you are the chosen one. And I say that to myself every morning, like you are the chosen one you were put here to solve hunger. This is why you came up with this idea. This is why you know, more opportunities are going to come to you more doors are going to open because you were chosen to do this. And then I think to continue to persevere because going back to just the fundraising and you know, we hear that less than 1% of all the Venture Capital goes to women of color that's extremely defeating. And so black women are getting about point 06 percent of all funding. And it's very little. And I just continue to think, well, if this works, this is, you know, what do you have to lose. And I think that's the cool thing about what good is doing. we're leveraging technology. We are a tech company, but we're solving hunger. And so for every day that we are in existence, people are eating. And even if we're never extremely successful for never a Spotify, Adele or an Instagram, we will be able to say at the end of our company, how many people receive meals because of us how much food we help keep out of landfill, which helps the environment food waste is the number three thing that we can do to combat global climate change. And yet it's something that we're not talking about enough. And so I think entrepreneurs need to get mentors if you can. And when someone says to you, how can I help you? What is it that you need? You need to have the answer there's someone asked me like, how can I help you if any of these ladies says that I'm like, Listen These are the things these are the things and just be open to opportunities that are coming, because they're going to come. And if you have been given that idea, it is your idea to take and go forth with in charge, I really want to see more female entrepreneurs, I think, you know, the only way that those numbers are going to change is if more of us come along, and we go out and we become the next Bumble, or the next Rent the Runway, these next billion dollar companies led by women, then what we can do is come back and start investing in other women and creating more billion dollar companies and more female entrepreneurs. And so that these statistics start to change.

 
JJ Davis 

They haven't changed in 10 years. Yeah, after the sale is when we started working in this space in 2000.

 
Jasmine Crowe 

And what's crazy to me is that the statistics of women that work in tech are terrible. And the statistics of women that are trying to build tech and get funding for it are terrible, so it's not there's so much work that needs to be done. By really feel confident. I will say that a lot of women and I am here today Even on this stage today, because of women, because women have said, Can you can you join this panel? Can you can you be part of what what we have going on? It's always been women and I think I love one. You know, it's not Women's History Month but I think everyone should pre Women's History Month, if we can support each other. It really like you said st be intentional about it and not just tweet about it and say we want to support each other. But when another female entrepreneur who is really small, inviting, send you an email, take two minutes out of your day just to respond back to her, even if it's just to say, I'm really busy right now, but I want to support you. Can you follow up with me in two weeks or send me an email with the questions that you need me to answer and I will commit to responding to those. That stuff goes so far.

 
Jenna Blaha 

It really is such a good reminder of how we're talking about impact here today. But how every single small step we take along the way can have such a huge impact right ripple effect on other people. dusty, you brought up podcasts? I think it is something that feels intimidating to a lot of people. But it sounds like it's not so much. How would you recommend we start with podcasts? Are there best practices out there? What would you say?

 
Dustee Jenkins 

First start. And there are about 500,000 podcasts on our platform, and it grows every single minute, every single hour. But I think about this conversation today. And it's this whole notion of if you can see it, you believe you can be it. Like we have to be out there leveraging platforms like Instagram, like Spotify to tell stories of women and success, and mentorship and leadership so that people know if I can see it, I can be it. And so if you are interested in the podcast, I would really encourage you to look at the anchor tool. It's so simple that you can get the technology on your cell phone. So you can record a podcast anywhere on any topic. And the the length of a podcast can really range I mean summer like Five minutes others are 20, somewhere an hour and a half. And so it really is up to the person and I there the topics out there range from true crime. There's some really popular True Crime podcasts, to how to podcast to tackling tough topics like education, children hunger, so every single topic under the sun, but I just would encourage if this is an interesting platform for you. It's an incredible way to tell stories. And as I said, the consumption of podcasts is just growing so so rapidly. And so you'll continue to see Spotify make moves in this space. And it actually can be a great seller source of revenue for someone I mean, many of these podcasts and people behind them have found incredible success in this space.

 
Jenna Blaha 

Are you seeing that any format, you said it could be three minutes 20 minutes or there's a lot of different categories are any of them doing better than others in terms of the return on investment?

 
Dustee Jenkins 

You know, it really ranges one of the most popular podcasts on the Spotify platform is a podcast by Joe Budden, who is from the music industry, it's an exclusive podcasts on Spotify. Some of these episodes are an hour an hour, 45 minutes an hour, 15 minutes, and people who are committed to what he's talking about really interested in it, they stick around. And so it comes down to the quality of the content like anything else. I think the points we're making around what makes a great post on Instagram, how to ensure your success, resonate. The same for Spotify. It's all about authenticity. If you have something to say, opening yourself up being transparent parent telling those stories, bringing on guests who can talk about their own personal experiences. That's a way to really ensure authenticity. And again, the topics can range from really everything under the sun.

 
Jenna Blaha 

I think that this through line here is all about authenticity and being really honest with yourself and being humble about where we are in the journey. I want to thank you all so much for joining me this year, hopefully next year. We'll see you back here and thank you all for being here. Have a great CES.

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