Video Audio  

This is not just the place with the world's best tech, it's unveiled. Its weird visionary ideas come to life. Because it's not enough to create amazing things. You have to create things that make a meaningful difference with people, real people, because they're the ones who decide what's worth talking about. What's ready for reality. It's tech that allows us to connect and explore and play in ways we can see and ways we haven't begun to imagine. And hear right now is where we'll discover the ideas that will change our lives for the better Are you ready?


Speaker  

Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications at the Consumer Technology Association. Jean Foster.


Jean Foster  

Good afternoon, everybody and welcome to ces 2020. I hope you're all enjoying day one. For some of us it's a quite a surprise that it is only day one. We've been here for some time to get set out but so far we are having a great show and we hope you will too. The consumer Technology Association. We believe very strongly that the tech industry has an important role to play in addressing some of the world's most pressing challenges be them in healthcare. jobs, climate environment are helping disadvantaged communities. This morning on the CES keynote stage, our president and CEO Gary Shapiro, and those that ca CES is partnering with the World Bank. And we've actually launched a global Tech Challenge to the entire world. We kicked off with our first challenge, which is in healthcare, addressing some health challenges in East Africa. And we're going to be following up with additional challenges in the next few months, addressing climate and also addressing gender disadvantaged. So we're very passionate about that in the tech industry and the role the tech industry will play. But we also believe that brands have an important role to play in helping address those challenges. And cspace ces is the home for brands. Every year we bring over 30,000 marketers, advertisers and brand leaders. here to see space in the area to address some of those tech issues. Today we're going to be introducing some of those great brands on stage that will be looking at the role that brands play in doing good. And those brands also know that doing good is good for business. To introduce those brands, please welcome me in joining medialink, founder CEO and Chairman Michael Kasem.


Michael Kassan  

Thank you, Jane and good afternoon. As we kick off a new decade, it's clear that purpose has become much more than a buzzword for modern companies that want to succeed. Purpose is gaining urgent momentum primarily because consumers are demanding it. A recent Accenture study revealed that 63% of global consumers prefer to purchase products and services from companies that stand for something meaningful Another study from Omnicom Porter Novelli indicated that 66% of consumers are willing to actually switch from brand they know to an Unknown, Unknown purpose driven brand. So the jury is in purpose has become a non negotiable baseline for how to do business, and an event like CES with a focus on technology, electronics and media, we get a snapshot of what real global change can look like. We can learn how successful leaders embrace innovation and change while holding tight to responsibility and purpose. I'm excited to introduce two leaders who understand the deep responsibilities of the companies they lead, which enables them to serve the various constituencies which include, obviously their customers, their partners, their employees, their communities and the world at large. They also inherently respect the role of technology when applied properly to achieve these goals. Alan jope, who was appointed CEO Unilever at the start of last year, is leading a company that's demonstrating the positive impact of operating sustainably. The proof in this case really is in the pudding. Last year, it was shared that Unilever sustainable living brands are growing faster than its other brands. Marc Benioff, the chairman and co CEO of Salesforce has spent the better part of two decades living the ideal of doing well by doing good whether bringing a corporate tax to combat homelessness, or backing or corporate tax to combat homelessness or making investment decisions. Based on the inclusivity of local policies. Salesforce has become a true Trailblazer. When it comes to business activism. I'm delighted to welcome both Allen and mark to the stage and discuss how their companies have embraced the philosophy of purpose and to learn more about the hopes they have for technological innovation to make our world a better place to live in. Mark and Alan, please join me


Michael Kassan  

So, first of all, Mark, it's good to welcome you back to the stage at CES. We did this. Seven years ago. I think I did the math.


Michael Kassan  

How was it? It was great. It was good for me. How about for you? What instead it was good for me. It was memorable. Michael, there you go.


Michael Kassan  

Both of you embody what I said in the opening remarks about dedication. And that dedication to purpose has actually been closely tied to the success of your respective businesses. What I'd like to do is really kind of dive into the link between societal and business progress, and why it's so essential that these two things coincide. Mark Starting with you. How does the purpose help you prioritize what you do, the decisions you need to make?


Marc Benioff  

Well for us, I mean it really started now almost 21 years ago. And the best decision I ever made was the day we started Salesforce. We put 1% of our equity, our profit and our time into a charity, a nonprofit organization. And that was very easy at the time because we had no equity. We had no profit. We had no employees. But today of course, Salesforce has about 50,000 people, we'll do about $17 billion in revenue, we have about 170 $5 billion market cap. So that idea that Salesforce scaled, because we put at the beginning, the seed of giving back then we have been able to do 4 million hours volunteerism we've been able to give, give back hundreds of millions of dollars in grants back to our community. Our we run 40,000 nonprofits and NGOs for free on our service, that right from the beginning. That's why we did it. We didn't just do it to build another software company or to do it one more time. That wasn't really what it was about it was to really scale it and do it the right way. And to realize that in today's world, that we could build a company that wasn't just about shareholders, but about all stakeholders. And that is what we have very much ended up with well and mark. Salesforce consistently has ranked at the top of Best Places to Work wherever I read those various rankings. Salesforce is always at the top of that list. So that's actually in been an enhancement to people to want to work at Salesforce. 


Marc Benioff  

So the files that the funny thing, Michael, is that you know, it's very simple. That, for many years, we were not on those lists. We were not ranked as best place to work. And I would call the various people doing those surveys and so forth and other tech companies and so forth are ranked highly. And I'm like, why are they ranked so highly? What is it that they're doing, that their employees love? And they said, Look, they his companies, they provide free food, and ping pong, and kitchens and five star chefs. And you just don't do that you're just not into that you're just into this whole volunteerism thing and you're into, you know, you're gonna have this narrative trust is your highest priority and giving back and that's, you know, that's great. But really, if you could have a kitchen and a restaurant, then you could really get in there. And I'm like, that's not where we're going with our resources. So the funny thing is, is the world change And I don't know exactly when the world changed, you might know. And all of a sudden, we started moving up these lists until, you know, we were consistently number one best place to work best was work. And then when they pulled these in place, well, why is it that Salesforce is number one? Well, we like the culture, we are there, not just to make money, but to get back. And the funny thing is, you know, I started Salesforce in 1999, March 8, and 1999. Because when I was at Oracle, you know, I felt very much split in my personality. I mean, this is why I wrote the book Trailblazer. I felt very much split. During the day, I was making, you know, software selling it, you know, to great companies like Unilever and so forth. But then I had a philanthropic side and then I was working in schools and all that, and somehow by, you know, I won't give you the you haven't read the book yet, but when you when you do But I don't want to give it away to you, Michael. But, you know, I had a revelation that we can do both. This is about the power of and you don't have to make a decision that you're going to be philanthropic and business oriented. But that's a false choice, that businesses can be a platform for change. That business can be the greatest platform for change, that you can orient your values in a way that you can transform as your company scales, and that companies today have an obligation to take care of the communities that they are in. So for example, in San Francisco, you know, we have adopted the local public school district, I've adopted a public school, every CEO in our country needs to adopt a public school. They have we have to be more dedicated to the kids that are coming up. I have you know, the first time I want to see yes, I was 16. I was writing video games when I was 1516 seven He years old. And I went to public schools. That's also where I learned about how to stop bright software. This is also what needs to happen today. And it's very important to me at Salesforce, that we're supporting our public schools or public hospitals that were taking care of our homeless, which is a huge crisis where I am in San Francisco, we have a tremendous crisis of inequality that we've been battling. And Salesforce has to be a part of it, you know, as the biggest tech company now in San Francisco, somehow, we now have to look back and go, yes, this is our responsibility, that we have a responsibility to all of our stakeholders, not just our shareholders, our shareholders are done fine, Michael, they've done fine, a 3500 or 4,000% return since we went public, you know, in 2004, shareholder return we have that, but we also have a stakeholder return. So when I think about things like that Those nonprofits and NGOs are running the kids in in this in those schools, the hundred millions of dollars that we're giving away to, to nonprofits. Those have to be measured as the stakeholder returned. By the way, the planet is a key stakeholder. We're a net zero company, we have to take care of the planet, we can see that the planet is on fire, we have to become we have to be carbon neutral, we have to pay attention to not just the emissions that are coming for a company, but also innovative way to sequester the carbon that has been emitted since the first Industrial Revolution. Because all stakeholders have to matter to us, not just our shareholders. And by the way, this is good business. You can see this is one of the reasons that Salesforce has become a high performance company. This is the markings of a modern high performance culture today and mark you talked about trust. I remember sitting on on this stage at the other theater seven years ago, and we talked about trust, then I flip over to Alan and I say, I've been fortunate to participate with Unilever. From the very day I started medialink. As you know, Unilever was our number one I thought you're gonna say from the day Unilever started in 1860. Yeah, I'm not all. But we've been able to participate in the digital transformation. Yeah, at the same time, participate and watch the purpose driven transformation of a company. And it's been extraordinary. Alan, you're obviously you know, celebrating a year plus in the CEO role, but you've been with Unilever, as I recall for 36 years if I'm not mistaken on my mouth, or pretty damn close. So you've been there for your, for your entire career, basically.


Alan Jope  

A lot of the things that Mark mentioned, we could not agree more with our business when it was finally In the meeting mid 1800s, the original founder he brought in great chefs had fantastic food for the people. And really the culture has been fantastic ever since then. No, we started our business at Unilever started by this this guy, Lord lever, human. He described the purpose of the company as to make cleanliness commonplace and lessen the load for women. When his workers were trying to find housing, he built them a model village, when the First World War broke out, and his workers went off to fight in the First World War, not only did he hold their jobs open for them, he paid their wages to their families throughout the whole period. They were all fighting. And so we've got a kind of 100 years of DNA that encourages us to do the right thing for multiple stakeholders for the planet for society. And I think if there is one reason for The enduring success of Unilever. It's the trust that we built out with multiple stakeholders by having a model that that shows that we care about things beyond profit.


Michael Kassan  

So this is a really a question to both of you. And I was taught that one is known by the company they keep. I feel fortunate to be keeping this company up here. But the two of you as CEOs, Unilever and Salesforce have done extraordinary work together was the impetus for that. And that's an interesting question. I guess. Since I'm asking it. I think it's an interesting question. The the impetus to that was obviously the technology that Salesforce was able to bring to bear. But it was also that Unilever, in my experience was interested in doing business with companies that had shared beliefs and the kind of partnerships you build. They aren't just about the dollars and cents. They're obviously we're all in this business. We're all in To make a profit, that is true, but you guys, there's something that was underlying the Unilever, the Unilever Salesforce relationship from the inception.


Alan Jope  

I have a view. And I think we started working together six or seven years ago. Because Salesforce is a fantastic technology company. That's why we started working together. And today pretty much every element of our customer platform, and our employee experience is run based on Salesforce technology. And so that shows how important Salesforce is to Unilever. But let me give one little story, which is a food waste was a country country so the food that is produced and never consumed was a country it would have the co2 emissions of the third biggest country in the world after the US and China and We as a food business take that quite seriously. And we were trying to figure out, how do we connect wasted food to these fantastic food banks that exist around the world. And Mark and his team stepped up and said, we can help with that. And so reflexively through resource asset. I think there was no commercial case for either of us. It turned into a successful project. And we're helping solve a little bit of food waste. So originally, I think we started working with Salesforce because such a great tech company, but the depth of relationship has become more based on values.


Michael Kassan  

So so I want to go back to trust when when Mark began the creation of the Marketing Cloud, what is that about eight, nine years ago, more than 1010 years ago. We were at that point where trust in in marketing had dissipated. It was at an all time low, and we talked about it back then. I want to bring that truck into this conversation because I think today, the consumer, the stakeholders, they want to do business with companies that they can trust, but they want to trust the values, as well as, gee, if I say I'm going to do this, I'm going to do it. They want to trust the values, they want to be able to identify. What I said in my opening is, people will now choose to do business, I believe consumers will choose to do business with companies that satisfy and tick that box, not necessarily in lieu of being able to deliver the services or products. But that plays a significant role. And trust was really at the basis of that and I think that was part of your motivation when you talked about it, even back then.


Marc Benioff  

Well, you're right, you're remembering this correctly. I mean, trust is our highest value and our company. For us. There's nothing more important to us than trust. Of course, there's many things that are important to a corporation growth, customer success, innovation. The quality of every human being the sustainability of our planet. These are all core values of many companies. But nothing is more important than trust, I think for CEOs today, and you kind of hear in the story of the beginnings of Unilever, the beginnings of Salesforce. But it's really true for companies today. And when I mentoring new CEOs, I say the first thing is you need to ask yourself, What is your highest value? What is the most important thing to you? You know, and for some CEOs, trust is not their highest value. And we all have stories, and we all know people and Alan, I know people were those CEOs trust is not their highest value. And in the technology industry, their CEOs, for example, who will say well actually mark, and I write about this in the book, so I'm not going to spoil it for you. Our highest value actually is the best idea When's the best idea is the most important thing in our company? Nothing is more important than the innovation and the technology. And that's the most important thing for us. Well, that could turn into a huge crisis for you. And as an example, I have their stories, where CEOs are not valuing the equality of their employees. So for example, female employees, women, gender equality, the importance that we have to pay men and women equally for equal work. I mean, this is a panel with all men, not a great example, I think, actually, in 2020 does not reflect you know, the kind of importance that we've put on gender parity, the importance of bringing women into the top positions in our companies in our industries, but it all starts at pay, pay equality, are we paying men and women equally at Salesforce? We've made Now, adjustments each year over four years $10 million so far, to make sure that we're making pay equality happen now Why? Why people always say to me now why is it that you keep having every year you have to make another adjustment? Well, we've actually done about 50 or 60 acquisitions in Salesforce. We have innovated organically and in organically, but when you buy a company, you not only buy the technology you not only by the culture, the brand, you also by the pay scales. And let me tell you, there's a lot of subconscious bias. And there's a lot of men when they're hiring women that they're paying women less than men. And when they're coming into Salesforce, we're going to rationalize that. We're going to look at that and say, are we paid men and women equally? are we are we going to have gender equality, the World Economic Forum, where I'm going in about a week has done some very good reading research that says it's still going to take more than 100 years to get for men and women are paid equally for equal work that is just unacceptable in today's world, and when I talked about key stakeholders, like the schoolchildren in San Francisco and the homeless, the planet, let me tell you, one of the key stakeholders for my company is our female employees. I need to make sure that we're taking care of them as well. And that needs an extra I go ahead.


Alan Jope  

That thought we're very proud that we've now reached a point where half our non executive board is women, half or non executive board as men, we have 12, six and six. We are in a position just at the end of last year, where 50% of our management around the world is women and 50% is men are exactly gender balanced. And I happen to know the data for the UK where we have a gender pay gap, which is that women earn 3% more than men. So we got a tackle. That one right away. And just to bring us back to technology, the next group, we continue to have areas, of course, where we need to work on better representation of women, particularly in senior roles in our company. But the next area we're looking at right now is people with disabilities, where we've said we want to become the number one employer of choice for people with disabilities. And we want 5% of our workforce to be declared self declared as having a disability. It's not something people find easy to declare in many instances. And you know what the biggest two thing the biggest two drivers for bringing in people with disabilities are going to be culture, a culture of feeling included, and inclusion in the form of technology. So when we talk about accessibility for people with disabilities, it's not about wheelchair ramps and lifts with low down buttons. It's about technology that allows people who are visually impaired or hearing impaired or dangerous issues to fill out Access, and technology is going to play a huge role. We have just give one story we brought in 52 people in our Egyptian business who have no provisionally impaired, and we brought them into the tele sales department. And it turns out, they dramatically outperform their able bodied counterparts. Because if you're blind, I guess you become a good listener and highly empathetic to your customers. And so we once again, like all valuable initiatives around purpose and sustainability, this is enlightened self interest. It's only good because it's sustainable because it's good for our business. So that's another area of inclusion where I think technology is going to have a huge role to play.


Michael Kassan  

And let me ask a question, because we're talking about technology. We're in that moment where the buzzword is purpose and as I say, both of you embody more than the buzzword you actually, as as I was taught, don't read people's lips, watch their feet up. Both represent people who say the things that you're committed to and actually do them. And that's critically important. But we're hearing about transformation on a regular basis today, companies that need digital transformation, I'm not sure you need to modify it with digital anymore. But transformation. The transformation that technology can enable isn't just in work process. It is in in purpose it is in making it a better environment for people to work in, and the outreach to the community. Are there any particular anecdotes that you can talk about where that has? You talked about the food and Salesforce stepping up and bringing the technology to be able to match it with the food banks? There's a great example. Are there others that you could point to that have actually driven the business of Unilever or in your case, the business of Salesforce?


Marc Benioff  

Well, I think that When we talk about digital transformation, for us, every digital transformation begins and ends with the customer. I guess, you know, we made a couple good decisions. When we started Salesforce 21 years ago, I mentioned one is our core values that we picked values that eventually aligned with the future. I think the other thing that we probably did was we picked one word to focus on, which is customer. You know, we don't there's a lot of things you can do in the technology industry, you have a lot of choices of products you can build. For us. We only build customer products, helping you to connect with your customers in new ways and helping to connect customers and companies together in new ways. That's our sole focus. When I look at the opportunity today, and I love coming to the show, because I'm walking the show. Well, one of the things one of our customers has a tremendous booth and introduce some amazing products today, which is Adi. I was so impressed with Seeing the new e Tron also the next generation highly sustainable vehicles, the sustainability of their supply chain, how they're going to green all of their products but also how they're connected to their customers in new ways. on my phone I have an audio up so that basically the to the drive an E Tron, the E Tron that I have shows up I'm I'm on each set of journeys with Audi, a onboarding journey so I can learn how to drive this type of a car. Also a journey that gives me the connectivity with the dealers to give my service support making sure that I'm taking care of the car correctly, and also connecting me with other drivers and helping me build community with other people who also have this same e Tron car. The car really is becoming more of my friend. I have a relationship with the car. It sounds crazy, but it's true, but I also have a relationship with the dealer. I have relationship with other drivers. That is what is helping The technology do for me, I'm helping to get connected in a new way. That's how I see really the future of mobility itself.


Michael Kassan  

It's It's interesting, because years ago, I had a conversation with some of the folks at Unilever, in the earliest days of social media. And the question was, do we need to pay attention? This was a dozen years ago, do we need to pay attention to this space? And I said, Well, I my answer is yes. But let me tell you why. My answers. Yes. I was trained that when I started my career as a lawyer, if you had a choice, just putting it in the right timeframe of using your feet, your fax or your phone, there was no email, there was no other way to communicate, use your feet, try and get in front of the client have that direct interaction. So my answer about social media then, was that connectivity, your ability at Unilever back then to speak to the 2 billion people a day that touch a Unilever product, and I think that Numbers close to 2 billion a day. Now you can communicate and to Mark's point about creating that relationship. All of a sudden, it's a two way conversation, both when there's good news and bad news.


Alan Jope  

So to the question of can technology help purpose at the center of our business? I think one way to think about that is pick the big problem of the day. Climate change, inequality, social injustice, lack of opportunities for women. deforestation, pick one. And I'll give you an example of how Unilever is having an impact. Take one, maybe I'll pick a controversial one. So deforestation is a massive contributor and also parts of the solution to climate change. Absolutely. And one of the most important materials that we use is palm oil. Now palm oil is becoming a demonized material, which is ridiculous. Palm oil use is one ninth of the land. That is equivalents like soy or rapeseed us. Palm oil has got a very good nutrition, nutritional profile and the world would be a hungrier place without palm oil. The problem is when concessionaires owners of of forests cut down forests to grow palm oil or destroy peat, ivalue peat land. Now the way around that right now is certification. So you go and you physically audit the concession. You physically audit the smallholder you look at their practices, and they either are sustainable or not on that day, who knows what happens the following week, the following month, so we're not buying 100% sustainable, certified palm oil? Do I believe it all comes from highly responsible growers? No, I don't. Technology is the solution. We're not working on a solution where you have the power of the eye in the sky. So real time photography, digital image manipulation, massive amounts of data being processed. On the cell phones of the truckers who are picking up the Palm Pilot fruits. And now we're moving into a prototype where we get real time always on technology to ensure that the suppliers we're buying our Obama from are not burning down virgin rainforest. you another example social inequality opportunities in all of these technology is bringing massive, massive impacts for the good of the planet and the good of society.


Marc Benioff  

Yeah, I'd like to just continue with this story, because I actually think that that example is a powerful example and a message for all CEOs. I have not really had an opportunity to speak to a CEO and I would say last year, that doesn't have a story exactly like this, where there is a focus on building a fully sustainable supply chain. So are these one example. Here's another example with Unilever. What is Unilever doing to making sure that every product They have has a fully sustainable supply chain. Because when that customer consumer buys that product at the end of the supply chain, there is going to be a QR code and they're going to say now show me exactly how was this product made. And bam on your phone. It is a story where you're going to see well show me that truck that deliver this product and where did that fuel come from? And that distribution house and how is that refrigeration done? And by the all the way back to exactly what he said where we talk about deforestation is a critical part of global warming. 


Marc Benioff  

We saw the research from a scientist in Zurich that that published in April of last year name Crowthorne has been published in Scientific American and many other journals that said that because we have Probably two to 300 gigatons of carbon in our atmosphere that we don't want there one way to sequester that carbon, which would help stop global warming is more trees. We don't want farmers cutting down those trees. What we want is 1 trillion more trees. We have 3 trillion trees on the planet right now. We want 1 trillion more trees. If we had that we would sequester 200 Giga tons of carbon. It's the opposite of what's happening if somebody's cutting down the trees for palm oil. So what are we going to do? We have to skill those workers, you know, and certify all the way to that point, when that consumer does buy that product at the store. They're gonna see that that farmer has taken that universe unit Unilever class, on deforestation, on climate change on the criticality of maintaining the forest and that it's built into the product. Now why that's relevant today is If we have having this interview, well, like we did, what do you say seven years ago? I go go back and look at it. I'm confident. Maybe we talked about values. Maybe we talked about trust, maybe we talked about giving back. But the concept of deeply integrating sustainability into our supply chains was not in the conversation. But today, for a modern CEO of a great company like Unilever, like Alan is, that has to be a key part of their strategy going forward. And many of the companies that are at the show today, you'll see that sustainability is a critical part of what they're doing going forward and reforestation, especially at a global level with a trillion trees, that has to be part of it, but it has to be deeply integrated into the end of the product and customer stores. So


Michael Kassan  

So Mark, I want to not misquote you, but I think you've said you know, technology is in and of itself, not inherently Good or bad? It's what happens with it. It's what you do with it.


Marc Benioff  

Well, technology has never been good. In fact, the history of mankind, we can look back and say, technology is never good or bad. It's what you do with it that matters. But that is true for your life. That is true for your business. You our business is the greatest platform for change. Look at what Unilever and what Alan can do. Look at what what all of us can do with our businesses. Are you using your business as a platform for change? businesses are also not good or bad, but there are some businesses that are good and some businesses that are bad, but business has to be a platform for change. We are in a world today, when we can see that we have issues Alan has articulated beautifully, so many of the world's issues. Our businesses have to be quiet forms for change. But each one of us in our hearts, we have to find our own answers on How we're going to be our own platform for change. We all have a role that we have to play in bringing that message forward, and kind of helping to kind of create this world and also solve some of the problems that we're talking about.


Michael Kassan  

So, generally speaking, the topics we've talked about are, I guess I really can't say it this way, or not controversial, because they are there are certain parts of these discussions that are very controversial, but in your position, as a CEO of you know, very large, important public companies. Do you find yourself at odds ever with your stakeholders or shareholders, for that being too central to what you're doing? Honestly,


Alan Jope  

hardly ever. So one of my misconceptions coming in as a rookie chief exec was that the shareholder base Wall Street, the City of London, would be saying, show me the next quarter. In a quarter, and of course, they want to see that. But each and every one of our quality investors has also said, take the long term long term view, run the business for long term success, and you will become irrelevant as a company. Unless you conduct yourself properly. It's that simple. People will vote with their dollars in the same way as us as a customer. You know, we as we look at the tech companies that we want to work with, we look, we look at three levels of responsibility, responsible platforms, responsible content, and responsible infrastructure. And if we can see a company that doesn't seem to give a damn about the content that's on their platform, but doesn't seem to police the content, and it's not worried about viewability, verification, measurability and impact will move our dollars somewhere else. And so behaving in a responsible fashion is a matter of business survival, and we firmly believe this is not a this is not a Good thing we're doing. It's our only way of running our company for long term success.


Marc Benioff  

You, as a CEO, you are going to be given as all of us are as human beings choices that we can make. And let me tell you a story. A few years ago, we got a phone call from our employees in Indiana, and our employees and at the end, I said that the governor, Mike Pence, who was a friend of mine in the office, there was going to sign a law that was going to distribute, discriminate, discriminate against the LGBT community in Indiana. And, you know, I look I'm fourth generation San Franciscan. So when you call me and tell me that there's a law being passed to discriminate against the LGBTQ community, and I'm like, you know, sitting in the home of gay rights, it was not I didn't really think it's possible. I And in fact, that's what I told her in place. It's not possible nobody's gonna sign a law discriminating against LGBTQ. And they said no. So I wrote a letter to him. Hey, Mike, you know, you know, we are the biggest tech employer in Indiana. You know, that's not this is not an in for our good for our employees or even our bringing our customers there were other things we're doing in Indiana, you don't want to really sign that law and so forth. And then they called me and they said, Well, he signed that law. And there's now a law on the books and actions are happening. And I was late at night. I was driving home. I had a driver. I probably had had a couple glasses of wine. I don't know exactly what happened. And I tweeted, I tweeted social media. Yeah, you know, Alan knows he's been out late with me and I, you know, I tweeted, well, we're forced to reduce Our investment in the state of Indiana, if they're not going to fully support the rights of the LGBTQ community, because Salesforce stands for the equality of every human being, and that was a test of our core values, because we're just standing for our employees for equality, that that is what we're doing. And I didn't realize that that was going to turn into something. And it did the next day. hundreds of other companies said the same thing that they were also before. Mike called me. I was working out in the gym, Mike calls me on my cell phone market, Mike, Hey, how's it going? Good. He's like, Look, I do know about this. What's going on? I'm like, Dude, what's going on with that wall? And he's like, What? What do you think is gonna happen? I said, Mike, I think there's gonna be rolling economic consequences against the state of Indiana. He's like, Well, what does that mean? It's like Mike, I don't know, actually, but I think we should change the law and I will work with you. And we can do it together and I will get on the plane with her. employees and we will negotiate resolve this for you. And we did. We went out there and we had a good conversation, our employees negotiated a change to the law, and the whole issue was resolved. And by the way, that's how things should happen today. Things we should have normal conversations and be able to resolve things. Okay. But

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