Joanne O'Keefe  

Good morning Welcome to day three of CES and day three of Research summit 2020. I'm Joanne O'Keefe and I am the strategic initiatives and events manager here at CTA and my research team and I produce research summit every year at CES. This is our 10th anniversary. So big year. We've got a great program for you today. But first, I want to take the opportunity to thank our sponsors, BCG, Cox, automotive, here technologies GFK Procter and Gamble vanir, the NPD Group segway, L'Oreal and Siemens mobility. So far at research summit, we've heard from industry experts on the biggest CES trends, the future of mobility and smart cities. Building trust in tech, electric vehicles, beauty tech connected data, collaborative driving the future of 5g and trust in mobility. We have even more content for you today. We hope you'll stay for all things three sessions we run all morning until the lunch break at 1230. And we're going to kick off today with a panel discussion from segway moderated by CTA tg will make the automotive case for climate change action. And finally here technologies will show us how AI enhances mobility all the presentations you see today will be live streamed and available online at CES dot tech backslash live afterwards for for viewing and sharing. four sessions with q&a segments will have a mic setup in the in the room break back there between the two sections. So please just line up and hopefully there's enough time for all of your questions. I'd now like to welcome say on Deb, who is our senior research analyst at CTA and moderator of our next panel how smart cities move

Sayon Deb  

Good morning, everyone. Thank you Johanna for introducing the panel. So today segways panel, we will be looking at the relationship and interdependence of micro mobility and smart cities. So, you know, the insights were really kind of focused on the future landscape of mobility. I'm sure you've as wandering throughout CES, it's clearly a major theme for the show. It's really kind of a show within the show, right. And so we'll be looking at micro mobility, transport solutions in the future as well as how smart cities and private and public enterprises can play together in that. So with that, I will take my seat and our awkwardly stand here.

So just to kind of set the context before we get started with our discussion, you know, from our kind of research perspective, we expect the disruption over the Next 10 years and mobility to really outpace any kind of innovation as well as disruption that we've seen over the last 50 years. So there's really this accelerated pace towards newer mobility options available to consumers as well as you know, users throughout the American cities as well as throughout the global landscape. Really. There's sort of four key factors that are driving these disruptions, right. So an all of them, again, are really visible and pervasive throughout the CES show floor. We're seeing autonomous or self driving vehicles, whether it's in larger four wheelers, or smaller kind of options. We're seeing connectivity throughout the entire CES show floor. Cars are gaining the ability to collect the data as well as repurpose it to provide drivers and users better options in terms of how they want to transport themselves. We're seeing electrification. Clearly, one of the biggest news stories out of CES this year has been Sony sort of surprise release of a self driving electric car. So again, to have the force or key trends. And I'm sure you know, there's lots of connectivity features in there as well. Lastly, we're seeing a lot of proliferation of sort of shared options, right. So while there is certainly a case we made for individual ownership of transport options, we're also seeing a lot of rise in the use of shared vehicles, whether it's mopeds, scooters, cars. And that's kind of a larger trend of a growth and sharing a general right so a lot of us have certain Airbnb ease. A lot of us have a user of on demand services, so kind of using as well as letting others kind of use the same type of resources. With that, we're going to have my panelists introduce themselves. So with that, if you'd like to kind of talk a little bit about yourself, your kind of role in the company, and then we'll kind of go down the road there.

Ibraheem Inam  

Okay. So my name is  Ibraheem Inam. And I'm working as senior software and control system engineer at the Innovation Lab of nine boards segway or headquarter is located in Beijing and we are really working on The innovative ideas and products and an AI integration in the technology and into our products.

Jack Gillin  

Good morning. My name is  Jack Gillin and I work as the Director of Business Growth for segway ninebot

Julie Tang  

Hi, good morning everyone. My name is Julie tan and the marketing director and the marketing director of segway.

Aarti Tandon  

I'm already  Aarti Tandon. I am the CEO of citizen eight. We own the property Smart City Expo Atlanta, which is the only US edition of the annual conference in Barcelona Smart City Expo World Congress.

Brenna Berman  

Good morning. I'm Brenna Berman. I'm the CEO of city tech collaborative, which is an urban solution accelerator based in Chicago, but developing collaborative innovation solutions for cities all over the world.

Sayon Deb  

Excellent. Thank you all. Again, thank you all for attending. Before we get kind of started deeper into the discussion of how start smart cities will move. I'd like to have my panelists kind of talk a little bit provide some context around, what are some recent mobility or smarts innovations that, you know, the audience may not be aware of. So, you know, we while we certainly try to pay attention to the innovations that are coming out, but the simply the breakneck speed of it, you know, it's kind of hard to keep track of everything. So starting with Brenna, you know, if you could share a couple of sort of mass transit Smart City innovations that use smart cities that are your cities have kind of implemented or have seen over the last decade or have in the, you know, recent time, perhaps one that's being currently worked on.

Brenna Berman  

So two of the projects that I would highlight, which I think capture trends that we're going to be seeing all over not just the US but elsewhere. One is the shift to demand side innovation. So for for really decades, right mobility, innovation or transportation innovation really focused on supply side right when you had capacity issues, you built more train lines or you widen the road or, and those things still go on, but the issue with that is it takes a long time to build a train line and Expensive etc. And it is locked in hard infrastructure. There's no flexibility to that. And there are certainly infrastructure issues we need to consider in mobility innovation. And I'm sure we'll talk about that shifting to the demand side or how you alter the usage of the infrastructure that you have is something that we're seeing quite a bit. So one example is actually a collaborative project that we were part of that started in Chicago, but that's been implemented in a number of cities around the world, which simply using a combination of data analytics and text analytics, etc. You can work to change writer behavior, specifically around the peaks and valleys created by special events or emergencies. We specifically piloted and developed this around a Cubs game if you happen to be a baseball fan. When there is a night game at Wrigley Field in Chicago, we get huge peaks in the usage of particular train line. And by using demand management, analytics, etc. We can change the behavior of writers without them leaving public transit, which is critical from a revenue perspective and usage perspective for cities, and drop that peak by about 18%, which is something that cities can deploy quickly and get real management changes out of their current infrastructure. So that shifted demand side solutions from supply side is an interesting change. And frankly, that's part of what is driving the whole shared mobility aspect, right is shifting that that demand side from your personal car to someone else's car. And then I think the other big trend that that you're hearing from lots and lots of companies is is everybody being deeply in love with the curb? Right? None of us were probably talking about the curb of even a year ago, unless you were a city planner, because curves are not new cities themselves have always managed the curb really tightly. They just didn't have they didn't have the right technology, be it video analytics to create the right inventory of what was at the current The curve is the vote most valuable real estate in the city for especially for government and for protecting the safety and driving revenue out of mobility innovation. And so bringing tools to the forefront that allows both the city government and the other organizations that are involved in mobility disruption, to properly manage and engage with the curb to the right ends for residents is is probably one of the strongest trends in mobility and micro mobility right now. It's a really interesting

Sayon Deb  

or the, if you could kind of talk a little bit about just more of a larger overall kind of smart city developments. Clearly mobility is a big piece of it, but we know that there are, you know, sort of larger factors at play here as well.

Aarti Tandon  

Yeah, so at Smart City Expo Atlanta, we convene presidents ministers mayor's from all over the world to really address the challenges that cities are facing and we are redefining the term smart we don't think a city can be smart unless you have affordable housing needs. And transportation. And so we take a holistic look at cities and of course, mobility is incredibly important to equity and access. Some of the examples that we've been able to see is in Providence, Rhode Island, they're deploying autonomous vehicles and underserved communities to help move the disabled and the blind and people who are marginalized. And, you know, we think about autonomous we don't really think about it being used in that way. And yet, it's going to provide quite a service for people who don't have access. On the flip side of it, we have stories like Peachtree corners and Georgia, which is the second largest autonomous testbed in this country. People are deploying the most exciting innovations from drones to urban mobility and, but like Brenda said, making sure that the city in the public sector is involved in making these decisions. So there isn't this constant rub and obviously the issues around you know, micro mobility Being left on the streets like how do we manage them, and places like Peachtree corners are able to take exciting innovation but make sure that it can be deployed well in a city so, so that's sort of a holistic look and I agree with you on on the curb and parking garages. And there's all sorts of issues around how we get urban plan around transport, right,

Sayon Deb  

as we kind of shift towards your models, you know, newer space, kind of, we have to think re kind of, you know, think how to use that existing kind of infrastructure. Julie, you know, if you could kind of talk a little bit about since it, you know, we are kind of here to talk about more innovations in terms of future mobility solutions, what are some of the new things that segway is working on? I know, you have a great booth here. The throne was, you know, unveiled, which is an interesting, you know, a product. So you could talk a little bit about the kind of the work that you've been doing a Segway?

Julie Tang  

Yeah, sure. Um, so I segue here. You know, we are the global leader of micro mobility, but in our mission, we are really focusing on short transportation and we want to simplify the moving of people. of an object's so I heard you know like Brenda and you know it were mentioning there's a lot of pain points like in current you know micro mobility and then as a company in a way do you want to solve those issues through technological innovation. So, if you have a chance to get a boost, which we actually brought several very interesting products like you know, we have semi autonomous Robo scooters which actually won the Innovation Award as honoree and also we have at 15 will will be like a commuter super lightweight kick scooter which has you know, the regenerate Radio Live brake system as market system. So, with Dez we think we can help solve a lot of issues we can see currently in the mobility and micro mobility industry.

Sayon Deb  

Jack, anything to kind of elaborate on top of that, you know, I think the, the, the kind of the energy required to Operating now you talk about regenerative brake system as well as the smart kick. I think that's really interesting. And he kind of like other, you know, tech innovations that segway is kind of working on. Well, my job is to get it out to people. So in that regard, we're trying to make it work.

Jack Gillin  

So if somebody says we're working, can I, you know, I've already used and rented a scooter and I really like that. How do I own one? How do I get one right? And so our mission is to get out and populate that around. To that end, we do get a lot of people approaching us which is great. It's very gratifying to see people come in and say, Look, I'd like to do use it this way or that way. And I personally get a lot of the emails from disabled people, right. One person was that Hispanic lady who had PTSD and she said, You know, I bought one of your cell balancing, cell bouncing units, and when she got on it, she got into a different mind space and she said, You should push this a little bit further with the the Ba because at the moment they they fund swimming lessons and some other things and she said this was very interesting kind of mind space that you get into because you, you're you're using your body and you have no controller, it's your body that is the controller. And I didn't realize that number one. And then I got another email recently in December from a person who's a cancer survivor and singer, my mobility is restricted, and I really do need to use a scooter. Right. And so, you know, but I'd like to this way in that way, and so I took that and I sent it into the product guys and, and it's great to hear those those things. So those are kind of some side effects of our current work. And obviously, we're trying to take that information in and sharpen our, our offerings. So

Sayon Deb  

it's great to hear perspectives, you know, in terms of underserved communities being offered micro blue solutions disabled population may offer I think, you know, that's really where you know, I personally find interest because I can walk, you know, I, it's always fun to be on a scooter, you know, you're on the outside air. So it's you know, but it's good to see those who needed the most, you know, kind of get access to that. Always good to have an engineer on the stage a room if you could talk a little bit about sort of the kind of the tech advances that you've worked on as well as you kind of seeing your team work on its segway, segway ninebot you know,

Jack Gillin  

so when I think as like technologies almost very difficult to make it invisible in the units and the products. So as you know that segways specialize in since bonusing. And they are potential, the limitations with the self balancing technology, like if you want to control the device, you have to lean move, lean forward and backward to move your center of gravity, so that you can make motions. So what we are working now on to, to actually we're to innovate some kind of way how we can shift autonomously the weight of the person And so that it can actually traverse along the sidewalks and everywhere. So, we have actually developed a new prototype in terms of esporte. There is actually two sense of how can we achieve this. So, what we have done here in is that we have actually a kind of a chair that can actually autonomously control the speed and it actually shifts the weight of the person so that the person has doesn't have to move, lean or lean body in the front or back. So, this is kind of silliness. And now, what we are doing additionally is that we are working on the AI integration and developing some new algorithms that can actually monitor this, the analytics of the writer that he if he's a professional writer, or he has enough experience. So the we have some machine learning algorithms that actually can modify its parameters on the runtime and it can help the rider to actually learn the device the device more efficiently and if he's if he's an advanced rider than he can be actually ride more in a more larger diamonds okay. So, this is like we are working on that for the AI integration we are actually working making the robots more intelligent we are giving them more sensors and we are adding like computer vision in there. So that this can help the this can actually make the interaction between the rider and the and the product one to one. So the rider really feels dependent on the rider on this on this vehicle and it the interaction really simplifies the Problem. Sure,

Sayon Deb  

I think, you know, I really like the point about making sort of technology invisible, right. So as designers, engineers, you know, you kind of struggle and think of these considered solutions, where the technology is kind of out of the way. And it's more of a usage focus. And I think that, you know, for many of us, using consumer electronics, you know, you kind of run into an overthought product, right there is like, well, there's all these controls, all these things that have to use. And I think simplicity is clearly you know, involves a lot of thinking and it kind of helps people adopted a little bit better too. So let's get started, you know, kind of talking about how sorceries move, I just start kind of talking about where we are today. So the current kind of city landscape, right. And clearly, as you kind of travel, and I'm sure most of you have faced traffic over the last couple of days coming in, just the sheer volume of it alone kind of creates traffic, just to share a couple of data points. from recent research data from Enric suggests that 46% of car traffic in the US is caused by car trips that are less than three miles. So you think about that distance. And you know, as you I'm sure as you've been kind of waiting in the cab lines, you realize, you know one person each getting into a cab career clearly there's sort of a an inefficient kind of a packing problem here, right. additional analysis from US department transportation shows that one third of us urban workforce can commute to their job in 90 minutes or less. So think about that less than a third can commute in an hour, an hour and a half or less. So the rest of us are spending much more time on the road. But if you could talk a little bit about how sustainable is that? I mean, clearly, I've painted a picture that doesn't sound very sustainable. So I'll sustainable is quite infrastructure.

Brenna Berman  

It's not. And it's not for a couple of reasons. One, especially speaking about cities, because rural issues are completely different. We can have a whole separate panel about that. When you think about cities, the you know, there's there's sort of two challenges in general, right? You have the congestion challenges, which you just captured really well. And then you have the last mile challenge. So you know, Chicago's the city, I know better And more than half of our population, which is one and a half million people total, like that half are there more than half a mile away from public transit? Right. So there's a last mile problem where they they aren't well connected to the the central backbone of mobility in the city. So you're both congestion issues and connectivity issues across cities in in the US and across the world. And so, it's there's, there's all kinds of solutions that will talk about to both of those challenges. The issue for cities is is how to make sense of all of these innovations, and which ones make sense in a given city, culturally, etc. The reason that, that it's important for cities to act now and to think frankly, long term. I mean, it's, it's very compelling when you're sitting here at a Technology Conference, and we're looking at innovations that are going to like fly at us in the next year or two, to forget that city's plan and a 2050 or even hundred year cycle. So the impacts to urban planning need to be considered now. And and the reason for that is if you look at some of those studies, if cities did nothing today, right, and all of these different both micro mobility trends and autonomous vehicles and even shared, shared mobility trends continue to grow, that won't actually solve or even improve any of the problems that we've just outlined around congestion and last mile connectivity, it will actually make them worse. So there needs to be a partnership between cities and urban planning and regulatory models and these technological innovations to make cities more equitable and safer and healthier places to live. Because these technologies like technology is agnostic, it actually isn't going to make anything better if that not applied properly in the cities.

Sayon Deb  

So currently, goal setting and kind of having in mind the purpose of why the tech tech is

Brenna Berman  

involved, and modeling to understand the impact and also thinking really carefully like already mentioned equity before, right oftentimes There isn't at the outset, there isn't the economic model to launch to launch these new mobility solutions in every part of the city, but that's oftentimes where your greatest mobility challenges are. So how, from a regulatory perspective, you can focus on solving the all of the problems in a city through mobility innovations, and not just bring those technologies to bear where people in the city can afford

Sayon Deb  

it. Right. And are the clearly you know, we live in a country that's there's a lot of individual ownership of little cars rights or individual ownership of vehicles. If you could share a little bit kind of your thoughts on what are the kind of social sentiments and kind of public consumer sentiment regarding these traditional modes of transportation as well as kind of forward looking? Yeah,

Aarti Tandon  

I would, I would piggyback on what Brenda was saying. I mean, I live in New York City and we have subway is our backbone, but there are people who get paid $10 an hour who have to take two buses and then switch three, you know, subway lines together. They're jobs and for them, they want a different mode of transportation where they can get on their scooter, and they can get from A to B and they could save time save money. I think the rub then becomes because we're not properly planned like cities in Europe, where you're on your car and bikes are in their proper bike lanes and safety is not, you know, an issue and everyone coexist. We don't have that. Those those plan cities, and it's quite hard because guess when you're a farther out of proper New York City, if you're in the Bronx or other places, there are ways for you to be able to move and, you know, even just do we require helmets, like there's so much that we're not even addressing, and it's quite a problem, but people want new forms of transportation that said, you know, can we have robots on our streets when they don't always are when they're not always able to recognize a wheelchair or a stroller or curb and just foot traffic in New York doesn't allow for it. So I think there's a real need for new forms of delivery, new forms of delivery of services if people have goods, but they have to actually live in the real world. And so I look forward to everyone coming together and figuring out the solutions, but it can no longer be siloed. And equity really has to sit at the center of all the conversations.

Sayon Deb  

Sure. So there's clearly a sort of a demand and you know, kind of a imperative to provide additional solutions that, you know, kind of cover the range of people who do move around the city. Julie, if you kind of share a segways perspective on that, I know what I know, you know, we you know, we're familiar with segway sort of work in like scooters are kind of the short distance transport, but I know that the company is also working on more medium to longer distance transport as well. So if you could talk a little bit about that as well.

Julie Tang  

Yeah, sure. So in our vision of the cities, you know, people they have like a Last last mile, you know, micro mobility challenges. At the same time people who commute you know, in longer, relatively longer distance, they might want something you know, like a scooter emo path. So this is where we see you know, the demand is out there and this is a great market to enter and just two weeks ago actually we launched our in our email pad is good ally in China at the Beijing or global conference, press conference. And we brought them to see us as well. We see we are like a global company. So we do see there are some markets in the world they, you know, have a relatively higher percentage of people they are actually commuting daily unschoolers unlike, you know, he schoolers are like on mopars. So, they they will, you know, benefit a lot from this and also just kind of want to, you know, add a little bit of my little two cents on work. RTM Brandon I just mentioned, I totally agree, you know, there are some pain points in the current, you know, micro mobility, scooter business. I see one being efficiency, one being durability and one being ROI for business because we are not enough, you know, frontier of the spin is we're not the operators, but we do supply 70% of the sheer scooter business globally. So, what we can do, you know, to help to solve these pain points, I think first we want to increase the lifespan of the schoolers they're using, right? If you if we see you know, their scooters laying around on the, you know, sidewalk, that's not good. It's not good for you know, urban image as I creating some sort of messy ness in our environment. So ways maybe like a self standing kick scooter, or even when you have the power off, you know, it will solve some of these issues. efficiency in our we want to reduce the, you know, fleet units as much as possible. And also, we want to have more more schools online and make sense for operators and make sense for people who are like riders. This year, we actually launched a swap wall, like a max like a kick scooter mass, which you can swap as battery. So with that, you know, we can probably encourage, you know, riders to swap it, you know, in return of, you know, getting some rider products, but there's a way how we can make this work in terms, you know, in the business model, but we do have this product ready for our partners. And of course, we bring in all kind of training men and all kinds of services just kind of want to enlarge the lifespan of the schoolers.

Sayon Deb  

You mentioned. uptaken other countries are sort of higher and the proclivity to us. This one's higher. You probably I'd like one or two examples on where you've seen kind of from side was perspective, where you see higher kind of uptake. And people use it more often I know China is a is a big example. Anything else, any other country you kind of point to where, you know, you're seeing large users of scooters as well? Right.

Julie Tang  

So when we are developing products, we do you know, market research, and like you mentioned in China definitely being one I think in Asia, larger population, they, you know, used to the behavior of riding scooters to go to work, and also India will be another good example as well. So we want to kind of, you know, study the local compliance and making sure does well that's what provides make sense to done in demand makes sense to governments, and also ways other safety features needed.

Sayon Deb  

Right. And you'd mentioned that you know, segue while you make scooters you, you also partner with a lot of companies. I know whenever I'm looking for scooter options in Washington, DC, where I live Uber is a big partner right? And I believe spin is also partner with segway jack, if you could talk a little bit about how important those partnerships are to the company. So in Washington DC lift is actually quite big too.

Jack Gillin  

So yeah, we can't boil the ocean. So we need our partners to help us with the type of regulatory issues that have been mentioned here. I actually I have a couple of questions for the audience. Can I pose

Sayon Deb  

it? Absolutely. Please do.

Jack Gillin  

Who came here in a scooter? Okay, no, no hands. Who's rented a scooter before?

Sayon Deb  

30%.

Jack Gillin  

Would you have taken a scooter here today? If there were some scooters outside? Would? Hey, that am the sound man in the back too. Excellent. That was about 30%. Okay, so we don't have 100% yet. So I mean, that's one of the things that we need to address to is how do we convince everybody to use the both the services and Maybe their own personal mobility options. So we're trying to go in and create lots of different categories of those mobility options, whether they're really last mile, I mean, I can only go a couple of miles on it, but you go further with some of our email pads and so forth. And so if you could refrain sorry, re ask your question against

Sayon Deb  

wonder I was, I was curious into in terms of how important the partners that were doing segue and kind of the ones that are actually on the ground level kind of delivering those scooters to

Jack Gillin  

it's a virtuous circle. I mean, basically, we had commercial, we have the consumer scooters out and then they were hacked, as in like, the IoT modules were put on there and the services came out of consumer, right. And then we went to another generation where we did more commercial style. And we had ones that didn't fold so you couldn't just take them away and some other aspects. So we've been, you know, kind of working with our burden is very much so and so we're probably on a couple of different generations now past that, and we've Certainly work very closely, you know, engineering team to engineering team. And the penetration has been very good. And we're really hopeful that, you know, the, it's still on an upward curve. So we're hopeful that a lot of the items that we're doing to correct the durability and some of the other things that Julie said, will improve those kind of linear programming curves of profitability, plus robotics, right? So this Robo scooter is going to be very important to see how that we solve those. You know, first of all, every time I try to find you probably found the zoo. When you're looking for a scooter, couple blocks over you get over to it may be gone by that right. So how do you get it to come to you number one, how do you get it to redeploy after you've clustered them too far to an event or whatever? How can they redeploy and then how can you recharge them, right? Because juicers are a big factor in Santa Monica. And so for those people, I mean, there was even a shameless episode. About scooters at one stage too. So it's really, scooter and micro mobility is getting into the pop culture and really getting into it, but it's very personal choice. And so we're trying to make sure that those choices are there, right?

Sayon Deb  

Just kind of zoom out for a second here. I know Brenna, you touched upon this for a little bit. What happens if we just stay as us Let's, let's say, you know, we stop, no more innovation and we just, you know, we just stop every, you know, we just everything kind of pauses Where do studies stand in 10 years, let's say 25 years right? Not to push you into painting a doomsday scenario for the consequences if we don't get some cities don't get smarter, essentially.

Brenna Berman  

I mean, I think the consequences are the the challenges we're seeing today just they simply get worse, right? congestion will get worse, which means the environment gets worse. I mean, you can actually find examples of this in in some of the super cities right where the density is is really intense. I think the average commute time in Lagos' now is close to to eight hours. So if you think about your work day, if it's taking you that long, right, so people are stopping their ceasing to work or because it is actually not economically viable to get to work. So it's it's not a mobility issue, right. It's an economic viability of the country issue. And that's, you know, way at the end of what could happen, which is why sort of collaboratively, right, the technologists and the cities, and frankly, the residents need to come together to say, here's what we want our city to look like 10 2050 years from now. And by the way, that answer is going to be different for Chicago than it is for Shanghai than it is for London, in Moscow, and even smaller cities, because these issues, by the way, exist in your hundred thousand or 70,000 person city just as much as they exist in your 4 million or 20 million person city. And where, where that city culturally wants to be, even in five years is going to be different depending on just the ethos of that city and the culture. That has always been there defining that city. The key is bringing together those multiple factors collaboratively to balance the public good with the market factors with and frankly, the differing opinions of what people want. Right? Because Because it's absolutely true that there are some people who wants all the different kinds, frankly, of transportation and mobility, right? I don't know that all people want all of those kinds. So to sit in the middle of that mess and balance out the the equity issue of making sure that everyone can get safely and efficiently and effectively to where they need to go. Is that challenge? And if cities don't answer that challenge, and it's frankly going to debase the economy and the health and wellness of every city,

Sayon Deb  

sure. And I mean, I are the you know, we talked a little bit backstage about the issue of kind of equity and access and and Brennan bringing up the issue of, kind of, you know, there isn't kind of a one size fits all solution in transport options. Well, not all mobility landscapes look the same, either. Talk a little bit about what the current, you know, issues in terms of equity and access are in transportation.

Aarti Tandon  

Yeah, I want to give two examples prior to that, though, because Brendan mentioned something about density. I was sitting with folks from Hong Kong who were saying, you know, they had given tax credits to anyone who bought an energy efficient car. So everybody bought a tech a Tesla was set and there were too many Tesla's on the street and there was too much congestion, right? So like, and now there's actually more carbon pollution because now it's, if you don't actually understand the full lifecycle of what you're planning, it's a mess.

I also want to give the example of most of you know, the the D o. t. grant that Columbus won. I think many of you may not know that the reason Columbus won that grant was because the problem they were having was that women couldn't get to the hospital and times deliver their babies. There's a real human issues the 

Sayon Deb  

smart Columbus vision, right? Yep.

Aarti Tandon  

And so when you come from that real human issue, you then say, Okay, this is how we're going to plan our streets or emergency response or signalization. And you're going to bring in the top partners to help solve that, whether it's att or Lloyd or whomever that's part of it, and you get this collaborative effort to solving the problem. But I think we have to actually stop and say what is the problem we're trying to solve? Is it congestion is it which then impacts carbon and so there's, I think it's, that's where she's, you know, you asked her if we just stayed the same and everything is thrown into the mix. Definitely going to have bigger issues. And I do think that when we think about smart city planning, you know, it is going to be about I think urban planning is the biggest issue to making cities smart. And when you brought up the curb earlier or Are we going to be able to repurpose parking garages? Because people are now using shared mobility opportunities? Or parking lots like can we create revitalize communities through that? Will the curb only be used for deliveries and no longer parking? Well, then what happens to tax revenue and their issues if we have more electric vehicles when then there's less taxes from oil, which is less taxes to create better infrastructure? So, you know, getting the urban planners to sit with the economic economist and sit with the city folks is really, really going to be important to making sure that our cities are smart and livable, and equitable and sustainable.

Sayon Deb  

As you know, you know, I'm sure you see the science. So CES, you know, as we kind of talked about as sort of the backstage pass to the future, right. So let's fast forward a little bit to sort of the future of mobility and smart cities and Julie, I believe you have a video for us to look at right so segways vision of what the Smart Cities look like. If you could kind of cue that up as well. Yeah, sure.

Julie Tang  

So we do actually have a video, as, you know, a little showcase of how subway as a visioning the future of smart city and especially how it's going to move. So let's play the video.

Sayon Deb  

So clearly, you know we see things in the video elements that are, again pervasive throughout the CES show floor AI integration, I imagine a lot of those are connected their 5g networks. So you know, the latency is almost negligible. Clearly cloud being is being used here, robotics, self driving vehicles or pods, delivery bots. So clearly, technology is being used to address different types of challenges, right? Could you talk a little bit about how segways technology specifically is shaping the future of transportation? Where do you kind of see, you know, what's kind of the next five to 10 year kind of roadmap here and Julian, Jackie, and feel free to kind of play off of the comments there?

Julie Tang  

Yeah, just, you know, kicks die and maybe jackin for me for the robotic side. So I'm with you know, I think what's really amazing as what you see in this animation is pretty much all there and we had this version several years back, then we are like making progress and bringing this product to life. So in our vision, we are seeing city with less Cars, people have more options in getting around from place a to place B and of course we have technological innovation that as necessary like we don't just want to you know throwing tons of like you know innovative you know technologies there just causes cool but rather as we see the pain points right and then we want to kind of use that technologies to provide solutions to make the current city better. So in next five years, I will say like for example depressional transpiling parts which is on our show floor is currently accounts are model but we are seeing this will be maybe in some weird like enclosed campuses by the end of this year, working with some professional partners, and we are bringing this for really for everybody you know, they can you know, travel in comfort in style. For places like airport same parks or shopping malls are people they are elderly people. They are physically challenge with a mobility issues, they're all benefit from this. And also on Max, you know, for their boss as kind of our they already, but then we need to work on, you know, more detailed kind of technologies and features to make it work. You know, like I think it mentioned, it should be able to recognize wheelchairs, right, it should be safe for pedestrians and for the robo schooler I actually saw the demo of how it's like going around which is really cool. So basically, it will go around pedestrians, I will go back to the charging station by itself after you know, the riders finish using that and do wireless charging there. But at the same time, what if there are too many pedestrians right? At actually just stop at a stop at the spot and then wait, you know, to the passengers kind of goes away and starts, you know, keep driving us. So these are the features we think, Oh, you know, kinda solve a lot of issues and be able to handle a lot of like complex situations on the road.

Jack Gillin  

So yeah, I'll add a few bits on the robotic side. So we think this is also going to be very, very big year for delivery robots and delivery robots are going to be with everybody and in mingled and they'll be in our hallways, and they have been in a hallway since the 70s. With a magnetic strip, just very simple devices going around with bumpers, that's how they stopped. No other sensors back then. Even in hospitals now you'll find $20,000 kind of food tray and dispensary systems are very expensive and very difficult to put into place. So you have to put a lot of infrastructure so we're changing that up with our delivery robots, and we're solving problems like talking to elevators, this is might seem to be trivial, but it's actually quite difficult. And because of given all the I have One Japanese resort asked me what, what elevator show would you buy for the robot, I thought was very interesting that the robots leading the choice of the elevator, because they want to make sure that their future proof in this space. And so I gave them a couple of names. And so in in robotics, right, we also have to really, you know, connect with people. So we do have a one robot called the LUMO. And it looks at you and it does some very, very simple things just looks at you and pays attention to, and we're going to do that with our delivery robots to our delivery robots will be will have to share the elevator with you. So if it's too crowded, say it looks like it's too crowded, do you mind if I come in and a lot of people say Go ahead. And so we're going to have very empathic robots and this is gonna be very important aspect of it. And so all of our products that can be roboticized for follow me so why push something if you can follow you in the first place. If you don't, if you want to remove, move it to some other place. We put in in smart ways. And I mean, we have many engineers working on how many engineers

Ibraheem Inam  

like almost more than 1000 engineers in the r&d department.

Jack Gillin  

So there's a lot of engineers I me like I was I was talking on the robot I just mentioned, you did the odometry. Yeah. Split up all the problems and they they go in and for our s potty did various other types of engineering.

Ibraheem Inam  

I already explained to them. Yeah.

Jack Gillin  

So. So basically, it's going to be mobility plus delivery. I think it's going to be a very big year for us this year. And I think you're going to see robots a little more on the, the, on the curb, and hopefully beyond the curb in you know, in the bike lanes, right? Because in Seattle, where I'm from, it's about $7 million per mile for a bike lane, and we're doing it right so it's kind of like you'll go three mile or a mile and a half to two miles, and then you get an intersection to go up the hill. So I will go that extra distance to be safe on that right. And so, and it is separate and it is marked out and it has priority in terms of the stoplights. So So there are some cities that are doing some really nice things in this space. Very cool.

Sayon Deb  

Yeah, I know. So near Washington, DC, George George Mason University launched a fleet of robots to deliver food and whatnot to the students and apparently breakfast has kind of surge in usage. so lazy college students, you know, clearly, you know, better nutrition is, you know, creates better students so that that's clearly a positive impact. Julie, I know you wanted to share some survey findings that we had recently done. I think, you know, that would be kind of a good opportunity to so

Julie Tang  

yeah, so um, we interested in finding out how the rest of the Americans not just segue, thinking the future Smart City is going to move and we did that little poll before came here and just want to share some interesting data points with you guys. So most Americans think transportation in cities leave a lot to be desired. And there are 780 7% of people thinking transportation is major problem in American cities, which I think most of us probably in all gray and 70% of them, saying rural and suburban dwellers would rather you know, they'll consider moving to city after transportation issues significantly, you know, improved. Also 90% of them, say electric scooters and electric bikes will improve transportation in American cities. So we're seeing this is not just big in Asia, it's a lot of people here actually with you. 89% of them are familiar with electric scooters. And by the way, the icon steer actually our real predecessor was pretty cool. And then Sunday, president of the think flying cars will Transportation. So we do believe flying cars for future. And 80% of them saying personal parts, electric motorized vehicles designed for one person to quickly safely take short trips will improve transportation, which kind of resonates with our vision for us part. Yeah, that's it. Cool.

Sayon Deb  

So as we're kind of getting near the end, I do want to, you know, have panelists kind of, give us some for predictions, right. You're all experts in your own field. So, burnout. I know you. You know, we talked a little bit about sort of the stewardship of the public way, right? What's the future of that as well as you know, your kind of predictions of what what is the next? What are the what are the 2020s look like going forward?

Brenna Berman  

You know, I think we're going to see changes in in the model of how the public ways manage. And I'm actually really optimistic about that because you have companies like segway that are thinking really hard about how their technology can make a positive impacting cities, how they partner with cities and the residents that live there. But I think that that does require those kinds of different models both in how you design and engineer and then how you deploy. I love the video that we saw. And I think what is challenging is how we get from where we are today to that video. And I do think we will see the the personal flying vehicles, probably sooner than people think because that's easier. There's nothing up there. Nothing to fight with up there.

Aarti Tandon  

I want to I want to make two points. One is the mayor of Helsinki, the way he looks at how a city as smart as his goal is to give one hour back a day to each of his citizens. So if we had a pod that could take your child to school so you could get to work an hour early and didn't have to drop them off. And you could be home an hour earlier is you know, an incredible way to start thinking about quality of life. So I'm all for the innovations that you're putting out there because I genuinely think that the transportation, transportation is taking up a lot of time in our in our lives. And I also think the flying cars and all of that is is incredibly important. And you know, we're not Dubai or we can just throw things up in the air as we're figuring out how we manage our own traffic's gonna be important. And then finally, I just think that, you know, if we can continue to really look at the people who are the most underserved because it feels like when you look at a video like this, it's such a luxury, right, but really, the people who need it the most are not actually the college campuses where the kids might be a little bit lazy and can get breakfast. It's actually people in public housing and places where they they're so marginalized, and how they get to work that having them be able to have a pod that could deliver medicine to them, if they're in mobile, or you know, finding ways to use these solutions. For people who just don't have access to transportation, as opposed to making it a luxury, I think is is really the way to move forward.

Julie Tang  

Yeah, I really agree on that. So we actually always have affordability in our mind, we don't want to just do something is luxurious people can really afford, because in order to make our vision to be in a reality, and needs to be able to have a lot of people be able to afford that. And we can actually see these products on the street. And of course, in order to make that vision to reality, we need to work with, you know, partners, like you know, you work with, you know, companies, like sad, you know, share school, their business, and maybe we can do like more sharing, part sharing. We need to work with governments, you know, on regulations, and some of the, you know, underserved communities, we can do our part and of course, we need partners to help us. We need governments to help us in order to bring that vision You know, to something we can see in the near future. We do wanna, you know, walk with a lot of partners and just, you know, hope people are like really supportive, and help us to get this together. And we can see it.

Jack Gillin  

Yeah, I certainly think affordability is a big thing. What we're doing is we're taking our consumer level factories and our knowledge at that mass production and applying it to robots. Because robots are very expensive. Most of the robots you'll see here, they have to reinvent the wheel literally, they have to all the engineers have to go in and figure out how to do the drive trains. We've been doing it for 20 years. So we're taking that that efficiency and that consumer level purchasing, etc. to bring our robots down. We have one robot there and somebody says, Is this a prototype? And it was a no, it's on the market for last year. And you know, the price they said they were astounded at the price. And these are roboticists. And so we're certainly We're partnering up with some companies that want to make sure that a we're not a lot of robot companies going out of business, unfortunately. And they want to make sure that we're going to be in there for long term and I am very well short of that, and that we have a very cost competitive and feature rich product. So that's, that's how we're tackling these types of issues here.

Ibraheem Inam  

Well, I cannot disclose the future technology without NDA, right. So

Sayon Deb  

anything any kind of general trends that you can kind of point towards

Ibraheem Inam  

Yeah, actually, the other thing is, I actually forgot last time is the redundant technology that we use in our products like we are going to upgrade that system like we have two systems running on parallel and if it's going to one in one gonna go, gonna fail and the other takes over to protect the system. So there can be tendency and everything like done software aided in hardware and didn't even the motor windings. Everything is redundant in the like in our current products as well. And we are going to have some upgraded abbreviation in that

Sayon Deb  

processor. That's great. Thank you. And we can take some questions now since we've got a couple of minutes left by time for just one or two questions.

Speaker 1  

Sir Mike over there.

Unknown Speaker  

Only the mic could be transported to delivery box. Ultra micro mobility solutions there.

Unknown Speaker  

Sorry, I probably took the longest path to get to my phones. All right. My question is is how a lot of single user solutions which are great, what are your thoughts on families or those that have to travel? Not individually or probably wouldn't feel safe traveling apart from like young children or someone special. Anyone can feel free to feel the echo was too bad for me. So what was the question? Cuz Yeah? Do you mind repeating the question again? Yeah, so I saw a lot of single user solutions for the micro mobility. What do you think of for when multiple people have to travel together, for example, like young families who might not feel comfortable sticking a child in a single user solution and sending them on the road by themselves? So the question was

Sayon Deb  

about kind of multiple use of kind of a shared solution. So two or three people can get into the spot or types of vehicles. You know, are there things like that that a Segway is working on? Or, you know, what is your kind of vision for that going forward? It's not just individual use kind of vehicle solutions.

Julie Tang  

Yeah, for as part you know, as really as a concept stage. We are seeing this you know, probably the commercial version will be out soon, but it will be in close can process the reason as Cause if you bring it to, you know, the sidewalk or the road there A lot of challenges. It really depends on the local government regulations and the safety feature we need to add on. But essentially, we are thinking of launching a commercial version next year, for sure it's our business. We do need to partner with someone to bring that into reality. But we're definitely open for that.

Jack Gillin  

Let me add to that. The s pod that we showed here and demonstrated is based on a cooperative venture that we did with gm 10 years ago, and that unit was two people side by side, still rolling on two wheels, self balancing. So we had obviously a multipurpose idea there. Some of our self balancing vehicles have trailer hitch capability. So a lot of people have added trailer hitches and done stuff, right. So same type of things you can do people tugged golf carts, so Rs Rs plus Lumo robot can have a trailer hitch and you and we're looking at, we have another product, which is kind of cool. It's a go kart, but it's really an extension kit. And that extension kit is powered by our self, our self balancing unit. And so we're going to have additional extensions, because we've done all the engineering, we've all done, you know, in hub wheels, in hub motors in, you know, regenerative braking, all that's been done 20 years ago, refined recently, and you'll find that there will be greater Multi Purpose options from us in the future. So thank you for that question.

Sayon Deb  

Thank you. Perhaps there's some opportunity for some wireless tuning as well of different kind of vehicles putting it together.

Unknown Speaker  

Another question?

Unknown Speaker  

Yeah, I'm Katie sender from hntb in Columbus, Ohio. And there are a couple stats given before that, like 46% of trips are less than three miles which I thought made sense and there was another stock given that Third of people live, more than three are live less than three hours from where they work.

Sayon Deb  

So nine to midnight, so less than 30% 33% traveled to work in 90 minutes or less

Unknown Speaker  

yet. So do you have any more details on I just thought that was really curious? Because it seems me growing up in New York and then now living in Ohio, that's

Sayon Deb  

I can share that offline with you. Yeah, that's fine. with you. So that's based off of a the US Department transportation analysis. So that kind of covers the entire range of US cities. So you know, clearly the landscape is different in different cities. But we can talk a little bit offline on that. Yeah. I just thought like more details on that. And with that, since we're over the hour, we'll wrap up. Thank you all for attending. Enjoy the rest of CES. And if you have any questions, please do catch our panelists. As we're headed out. I'm sure they'll be happy to answer any questions you have. Thank you all.


 

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