Speaker  

Ladies and gentlemen please welcome to the stage our network infrastructure is key to Smart Cities panel


Carla Bailo  

Good morning, everybody. We're so excited to be here to talk about smart cities and talk about the infrastructure that we're going to need to be able to put in place all of those sensing devices to really improve the lives of the citizens in the city. And we have three great speakers here today. One is from the cellular tower industry, but also has a lot of overall knowledge about the Internet of Things and the infrastructure side. Then we'll go through the cellular side from at&t. And then we also have Jen here from FirstNet, who will give us some examples of safety response and other things that they're putting in the cities that are really making a difference in the safety and the lives of the citizens. So we really want to get into practical examples here. And we'll open the panel up about 1015 minutes remaining. For questions from the audience, there are two speaker stands. And I'll welcome those and let you know when we'll begin. So the speakers are going to introduce themselves and give us a high level thought about the whole subject. And then we'll get into our questions. So I'd like to start with Ed Knapp from. He's the CTO from American tower.


Edward Knapp  

Thanks, Carla. Well, good morning, everyone. It's great to be here back at CES. And looking forward to the discussion today. So American tower, many folks may not have heard of this business, but we've been around about 25 years. We're the largest independent tower company globally. And we run about 180,000 towers around the world in 17 countries 41,000 here in the US, and the business is really an infrastructure real estate business. So we try to horizontal eyes, some of the digital infrastructure that's needed so we can share that infrastructure with multiple providers and make it more efficient. So part of that is in a smart Cities are in a build out of different types of IoT solutions. We want to be able to provide that infrastructure. What it starts out with is fundamental things like space, and power and connectivity. And those are the fundamentals that we provide. When I joined American tower, I came from Qualcomm, I spent a long time in wireless about three decades plus, everything from one G to 5g, even the research in 5g, and what I joined the company is to really help them look at the future and innovation. And part of that innovation is looking at our assets in the form of what would be outdoor towers in building systems, and the future of 5g. And that led me to believe that there's a lot of opportunities to help migrate some of those assets into new areas. So some of the things we're doing, for example, in the US, looking at edge compute that will help improve the responsivity of certain applications and environments. A lot of that leads to CV to x and automotive and the future of automotive and how those clouds forms are evolving. All the things we're doing around the world as an example, in Brazil, we have stood up a wholesale IoT network using Laura throughout the country. We have 1200 gateways, and about 70% of the GDP is being covered. And also in in France in advance of the Olympics and some other work that's being done. We have a project called Paris to connect, where we're doing some work there at the in a smart city level with some sensors, and we can talk about that further. But it's an exciting time, a lot of things are happening. And there's a lot of good technology. But I think the real opportunity here is to look at the use cases and solutions for customers that really takes a long timescale to get in place. It's the software is the people in the process part that's really the most challenging technology. I think we've done a lot of good things with. So thank you.


Carla Bailo  

Thank you, ed. Secondly, I'd like to ask Mike Zeto to introduce himself. He is the VP of Advanced Solutions Internet of Things solutions for at&t business.


Mike Zeto  

That's a long title, but I can what that means. So my name is Mike Zeto, and good morning, hopefully you guys are having a great CES, I run the emerging businesses for at&t IoT business. So I founded the Smart Cities business four years ago, actually at the show, we announced it, we've made a lot of progress. And we've taken a little bit different approach than you would normally think at&t would take connectivities. Obviously, the thread that's weaved through all of these IoT solutions that help you create a smart city, but we've really taken the approach to create end to end solutions and almost act as a master systems integrator to help cities drive a strategy that's holistic with with outcomes, right. And we focused more on that than just on the connectivity in the infrastructure piece, because that's table stakes for us, right? So you know that you're gonna go into the city and at&t was there for 140 years and working with municipalities and we've got employees that work there and live there and business customers. But the approach that we've taken from an IoT and a smart cities perspective, which is a little bit different from some of our partners in the industry is really focused on what solutions can we develop, to put on top of the network to leverage that infrastructure and drive outcomes for the citizens. And along with the Smart Cities business, I also have our drone program, which ties back into public safety. I've got FirstNet for IoT, you know, which we certainly can talk a lot about. And then I've got our utility practice as well. And the and the solutions that we take to utilities, which, of course, are a big part of scaling out any smart city, region, right, or any region that's going to focus on smart cities, because it's definitely going to take a village to get any kind of scale. You know, I think one of the things we can talk about today is what is going on out there from a smart cities perspective. And there's still no cities that are really that damn smart, right. I mean, there's a lot of smart corridors. There's a lot of smart projects, but it's really, really hard to work with policy and to scale things out. And I think that's a big area of opportunity for us over the next three to five years, to work together as an ecosystem to really help cities scale and provide value In an equitable way to the citizens and businesses that they're serving.


Carla Bailo  

Thank you very much, Mike. And then I'd like to introduce Jen harder. She's the Senior Director for product, first responder network authority. FirstNet.


Jennifer Harder  

Thanks, Carla. Yes, my name is Jennifer harder. And I am the Senior Director for product with the federal government, which is its own strange beast. I'm sure it's a little unique to all of you. But we are the governmental component of a public private partnership with at&t that has fielded FirstNet and FirstNet is the nationwide public safety broadband network. So the intent there is to give public safety the pipe way that they can begin to use all the technologies that a lot of us use in day to day life, but to help make public safety smarter, and make public safety safer and by extension make all of us smarter and safer. So we're working to get that nationwide network fielded so that all the different public safety entities think law enforcement, fire emfs, emergency management, 911 communications, they can all begin to use that pathway to help us along. A lot of what we're here doing at CES is kind of twofold. One, looking at the smart cities. concept and saying, Hey cities, if you're going to go smart Public Safety's a major component of what you're doing in that smart cities ecosystem. So think about your first responders and how you're better equipping them to make the community function better overall, top to bottom, and to even beyond just the cities themselves and the governmental entities, hey, industry, public safety is a industry that you can leverage. How are you entrepreneurs coming up with ideas that might benefit public safety responders? How are you developers thinking about what public safety could do with the technologies that you've developed maybe just for general use, but if you tweaked it just a little bit, maybe public safety could leverage that in some way to reduce response times to increase safety to reduce, you know, fatalities and that type of thing in your community. So looking at all the different ways that we can begin, really to bring the smarts of the CES community to bear on some of those public safety problems.


Carla Bailo  

Thank you, Jen. And then for just so I know the audience composition Little bit how many of you are in technology and internet of things? And how many of you are actually municipalities or from the cities? So very few, but I'm glad you're here because we think it's really important that you hear some of this and cascaded on so one of the things that that that kind of plagues cities, is this dysfunction amongst the different units. So in your work with cities, you know, what are those key pillars? You mentioned utilities, you mentioned safety, those are both, you know, departments within the city, but there are many more. So what are those? And what are the some of the enablers to be able to have them work in better in tandem than they are today?


Mike Zeto  

Yeah, I mean, you know, I'll start, you know, I'm working with different levels of leadership in cities every day, but primarily at the CIO in the mayoral level, right, or with city managers in cities that are really led by city managers, weak Mayor cities. You know, it's interesting because I don't know that I call it dysfunctional as much as they really have a hard job, right cities are strapped from a resource perspective. And traditionally, they've been run in silos. And so where we found success is when we could go in and we had a mayor or city manager that believed in, in the Smart Cities vision, if you will, right. And knew that there were problems that could be solved through using innovative technology, right? IoT technology, if you want to call it that, and communications technology. And and it really starts there. And then you know, where we've seen cities that have had success is when when the mayor the city manager has said to their, their CIO, if you will, or their CTO, whatever they have in place, start to look at developing out a holistic strategy and go and talk to the different department leads, right. Where we've seen things not work is when you've had a mayor say, oh, we're going to go do this. That's going to be my platform. And a CIO say, Okay, good. I'm going to make that my way to my next job in the private sector, right? Just go do what they want and not involve the department leads and DP w that's managing waste and in public safety. And, you know, that's where we've seen, you know, the differences in the cities that have made a leap forward, where they have more pilots projects a little bit more scale than some of the others. It's really, it's really ones that can communicate well across those different departments and get them involved early versus try to dictate something down because they're trying to build their own platform for another purpose.


Carla Bailo  

Does anybody have anything they'd like to add?


Edward Knapp  

We we've seen a few things, obviously, the department budgets and how those get allocated for their functions is a isn't an issue then then you get into things like privacy and security, which are key factors for any city that takes on a lot more sensitive data. What do they do with that data? How do they process it? How long do you hold it? There's a lot of regulatory and other sort of basic questions that they also have to deal with. I think getting the pilots out there and getting your hands dirty. We found In the case of Paris, here's a large city. And they have a lot of things coming up with the Olympics and so forth. And they're trying to improve, you know, sort of the exterior user experience of the citizens. And to go through a long process of, let's say, a formal because everything has to be bid. It's all public, because we just said, Let's get a few folks together. And we'll lead a consortium of multiple players and just try something, right. Everybody contributed their own sort of pieces, it was kind of like, you show up and you bring your own food to the dinner and you've share. So we did that. And it started to, you know, there was people who didn't want to participate. And then after two or three or four folks got together, and they started to see something really happened, then now somebody else came in another person came in, but there was one or two key elements, which was the rapid Area Transit team that wanted to create an autonomous shuttle, and then other people that wanted to provide connectivity, like ourselves and infrastructure. And then folks started to come from the operator community because they saw that there was something real happening as opposed to just You know, meetings and discussions. So it's getting your hands dirty with sort of these trials, I think will really help show the the folks that, that Mike talked about in those cities, that there's something they're there and they can benefit from it.


Carla Bailo  

And what about on the public safety side, I can imagine that exists kind of in a silo, but you needed more than just that department to


Jennifer Harder  

it does work successful. I mean, there's certainly some siloed efforts that go into play, but a lot of what public safety does for good or bad really does cross silos. You start to mix and match across the community and get to that notion of the holistic community. We can't have one piece working without the other. And at least some of the areas we've seen good successes is when public safety is able to articulate a technology need or an idea that other departments other silos, other areas can see a correlational benefit from So hey, yes, public safety, you might be implementing something like a shot detection technology, or you might want to implement something like a body worn camera technology. What are the correlational impacts across that community in things like better community support, reduced crime rates, which could then connect to things like increased home values, safety values, etc, begin to put those pieces together. And now you've got communities wanting to work to better enable their public safety support because of the other dominoes that fall down the line after that. So that governance collaboration outside of the traditional public safety silo further through the community seems to get more bang for the buck for the various different technologies they want to


Mike Zeto  

deploy. And we've seen that we've seen that in in the case of video because video if you think of of IoT sensors, video is going to be the most pervasive sensor that's out there and one that certainly needs a communications component right. And in some cases will need 5g right and IE low latency if it's used for certain use cases, but but PD is usually involved in the video use case that's a that's a use case, you know, video that can cross all the silos and in many cases That's led by sometimes a police Foundation, right? Like in Atlanta with the Atlanta police foundation versus the actual chief of police and their group leading something, you have these Police Foundations that are out there that helped to enable some of the pilots if you will, to, to to work around public procurement in a way that you can do the pilots not preclude yourselves from, from the bids, right to Ed's point about policy and how difficult it is to do some of these pilots. And then, you know, we've also seen it across fleet, right, because if you think of fleet management systems, when we first met enable our fleet solution for first responders, but you also have dp W and other city owned vehicles, municipal owned vehicles that need a fleet solution as well. So, you know, those are the examples of use cases where, you know, from a public safety perspective, you may have a police foundation or somebody else starting to break down the silos for the CIO, right? Yeah.


Carla Bailo  

So I have one question and then I want to revisit Back to the RFP process and navigating that, because that may help some of our technology people here. But my question I just wanted clarification, when you said CIO, was that Chief Information Officer Chief Innovation Officer, that's,


Mike Zeto  

that's a good question, actually. Right. And it's and that's that is what's different in every city. Right? Right. You have a Chief Information Officer, which may be the traditional person that was responsible for managing the servers and the laptops and the upgrades and in true technology, right, and and then you've got a Chief Innovation Officer now, which is usually a different position, but not every city has the budget for that. And then what you're starting to see now even is a director of smart cities, right, or something at that level that would report into a chief innovation officer to have one or two CIO,


Carla Bailo  

right in our use. Are you all seeing those cities that have appointed a specific person to manage this integration or managed smart cities? Do they seem to be propelling ahead of some of the other jurisdictions is that a needed position is my question.


Mike Zeto  

Yeah, I think you need it. I mean, you needed to really put some focus on it. And it could really be at the director level, right. You know, in Dallas, you get the Dallas innovation Alliance, which is a public private partnership, but then you also, and that's an area for you to go trial technology that's more cities related in the West End. And then you also have a position in the city that's the director of smart cities reports into the Chief Innovation Officer, which reports into the city manager, which in that city is who's going to call most of the shots with Council, right?


Edward Knapp  

And here in Vegas, they actually have that set. That's right. Yeah, they actually I think are one or more of the progressive cities in having experimented brought parts of the technology community together, experimented with all these different, let's call it use cases and try and identify ones that create efficiencies, and cost savings that that create the business models so that they can scale and I think that's still to Mike's point. One of the inflection points that we're seeing is like, the piece parts are there, you got to get past this. Let's get it out there and at least try so you have to have these individuals. In the organization's to get behind those initiatives and align the different, you know, let's say departments, but then getting that to the next level of funding that and scaling that, I think is where a lot of cities get stuck.


Mike Zeto  

And you know, it's interesting because you mentioned Vegas and you know, for those of you that are here, if you have the opportunity, you know, you should go down towards old Vegas and go through the innovation district. And I believe there's a there's a site that you'll be able to hit and it'll it'll explain to you what's on the Smart City technology is down there. We've done a pilot there with intelligent lighting controls where they've gotten 80% efficiency around their led around the energy usage with LEDs and with controls. We've got air quality solutions deployed down there all cellular enabled, and you know, here in the city, they're they're forcing that customer right so I mean, in we've got 5g deployed here, right so you know, it's when you talk about a smart city, it's not just about the the widgets and you know, I mean it's really about taking it you know from you know, the point five G or using NB IoT and LTM, like we were talking about earlier for some use cases, to the public safety component with FirstNet being deployed and then starting to experiment in those innovation zones where you actually are able to capture data that can show the positive outcomes, which then will give you the ability to go create an ROI and get the funding to scale it right.


Jennifer Harder  

And, Carl, you know, you mentioned the importance of having someone at the city level who's looking at this, who's focusing on this and whose job it is to dedicate to it. We've worked with public safety agencies, a police department comes to mind specifically in the past that just looked at me and said, I can't do all of this technology you want me to do I don't have a looker. In my department. I don't have someone whose job it is to look ahead and catch the next thing on the horizon that's coming. I have five other jobs that I'm doing for this department. You can have someone at the city level doing it but until we have folks at the agency level also together, working, cross top to bottom, really seeing what's coming and being able to catch the wave as it's coming along. Public Safety's traditionally very far behind that wave. They don't have a looker. So how We'd begin to help those agencies put those pieces together and take advantage of it when it's right for them as opposed to always kind of being behind the times. That would also be a good city mechanism to begin to kind of correlate across those departments.


Carla Bailo  

Absolutely. So definitely in the research that we're doing at our center, we're seeing similar results. So cities that have appointed a key person to coordinate everything that's happening there, prioritize it work on the budget, are those that seem to be propelling further ahead than the others. So let's let me ask about that. The RFP process technology is moving so rapidly, you know, and we have this kind of snail paced RFP process and I apologize if I'm, if I'm upsetting anybody in the cities, but it takes a long time. Are you seeing cities doing anything to improve that process? So there is more rapidity so that they can go faster to meet the citizens demands? Or are and is that also related to those cities who are probably at the top of the pyramid Today in terms of being smart?


Mike Zeto  

Well, you know, it's interesting because you are starting to see policy changes, right. And the policy would drive that RFP process the procurement process to a certain extent, right. You know, in and I'll just give you an example. In San Jose, they had policy that was in place because they own their streetlights, right or a vertical asset. And probably the two most valuable things that that you're going to have from a city's perspective to monetize are if you own poles, right and in the curbs, in you know that I mean, with the work that you're doing, how valuable that curb space will become with everything that's happening from package delivery to ride sharing to scooters that right. You know, but but we've seen at San Jose, we were able to actually create a public private partnership with San Jose, which allowed us to exchange value because they were able to based on the policy they had in place and owning the polls, exchange the value if it was for public benefit. And provided benefit to all communities equitably, right. So we were able to exchange value for those poles and provide them with technology that they deployed around 14 public parks and community centers, which gate created a safer environment using LED lights and controls. And then more efficient, obviously, sustainability is big, and then public Wi Fi. And then we were able to also contribute to some programs that they had in place to bridge the digital divide, both from a digital literacy aspect with the aging population, and also with the underserved. So policy there, that was a good example of policy. You know, in other areas, you've got just traditional Procurement Policy and by the way, we were able to move very fast there, a couple of council meetings and you show the value and you're off and running. But what the outcome of that will be is a typical procurement for a larger scale project. LED lighting, right? So there are ways to navigate the process if they've got the policy in place, but we're just not seeing that across a lot of cities with the exception of saying, We've got this one Innovation Zone that you can do something in. And if it's under X amount of dollars, we'll let you go and deploy there. Right, which really will never let you get scale. So that's that's about the best policy you can get to get started. Right.


Carla Bailo  

And, and, you know, the cities are starting to transition to 5g. So how's the how's the RFP process working? And how quickly Are you seeing cities begin to migrate?


Edward Knapp  

Well, I think the first the FCC has tried to make it easier for the deployment of 5g. I think this has been going on for well over a year now with some of the regulation that they've put in place. And there's always this, you know, balancing act between, you know, being mindful of these statics and the requirements that the citizens have in the city as far as the densification of those networks, and the need to get those networks in place. And that's still being played out somewhere. The courts as well, I mean, in some cities have said, Hey, we're not going to take that model that says you have to allow your public infrastructure to be used. But I think, you know, one of the things that, I think, to Mike's point is, you know, what we need to do is take those success stories, turn them into playbooks and then share, and then try to make sure that how someone procure something can don't reinvent the wheel every time. So when you do have a successful deployment of say, a 5g, small cell network in a city, what led to that success? And then how does that get translated amongst the the communities I was at? There was a Yale mayor's conference that that's run every year by Jeff Sonnenberg at Yale University. In all these cities, like 120 cities, mayors are at this event. We talked about some of the things that they're struggling, they're more struggling with opioid crisis and other types of things and that their ability to worry about the 5g infrastructure is not necessarily high on their priority list. Right? So so you have to have this advocate You have to have someone who is looking towards the future, and then learning from these early adoption modes to try to drive it so that the bid process can be more efficient. And I think we as as a, as a, let's say, a nation, there has to be a way to do that better, because there's so much fragmentation. And there's probably a lot of it's almost like a company. If you have a lot of departments that don't talk to each other, it's going to be inefficient. You need to have that sharing and that communication, I think that will help make the process a lot better.


Mike Zeto  

And I think it's almost like it's more like a process versus a procurement when you're deploying 5g because at&t, we're I mean, we're all involved in this in the scale of communications infrastructures. Right. And we're working closely together. You know, where we're deploying anyway, right? I mean, so we pay the attachment fee. We go through the permitting process, right. And then we're deploying and then we deployed in 19 cities, we've got 5g 19 markets and we've got we'll have pervasive 5g at the tower level right across the US by mid 2020. And we've got millimeter waiver 5g plus, which is extremely low latency, right? In the, in 35 cities already, right. So, I mean, you know, we're, we're deploying anyway. And again, we'll have that coverage, you know, throughout this year, just continuing to turn it up. And we've done that, because we've been able to get a head start, I should say, in many ways because of the relationship with FirstNet in our responsibility there to first responders, right and to the FirstNet authority, because when we're going out and we're, we're we're touching the towers to prepare them for FirstNet. We're also turning up the spectrum that's there, and we're adding more fiber, right, and then we're adding what we need for 5g. So we're touching the tower one time getting ready at from a macro perspective, because we've got to have that FirstNet coverage ubiquitously across the United States. And then we're going into the the markets, if you will the cities and deploy a millimeter wave for densification. Right. So it's happening anyway. And again, we're we're doing a lot of that in concert in partnership with with people on the stage.


Edward Knapp  

One point to add to that, just so so when you look at 5g, there's still a lot of confusion for folks. And I want to just Mike mentioned all the right words, but just to put it in context. So what we what I just talked about is really the high band. So think of it as there's low band band and high band spectrum. The high band spectrum is the millimeter wave, very short range, let's say hundred 200 meters, very high throughput like gigabits per second. And that's, that's some of the investments that the operators here have been making in the US. And it's great, and it really is transformative in terms of data rate and capacity. The mid band spectrum is something Ajit pi and the FCC still trying to figure out how to get more of that spectrum into the market. And that's something that is important for wide area and so a lot of towers will be upgraded and managed to support that. But we also have low band and that spectrum has been transformed and can be transformed with DSS, which is dynamic spectrum sharing so you can take 4g and 5g and mix it together. So you can get 5g fairly quickly across the country. But to get the real true 5g, you need these large spectrum allocations in mid band to get high capacity and wide area coverage. And I think that's where, you know if I can, if that's simple in terms of what I said, there's three buckets, and all of them play a role, and to FirstNet, and the folks that can start out with getting 5g into the low band spectrum by through the SS, and then they could upgrade from there.


Carla Bailo  

So then from a cost perspective, if a if a community wants to have this wide band 5g, they don't just have to invest in the towers, they have to also invest in these other devices, or is that all part of the package so to speak,


Mike Zeto  

we think you more have the carrier's invested, right. And we've invested 100 and $30 billion over the last, you know, seven, eight years and infrastructure in the United States as a company, we're, I believe, the last I read, we were the we've made the largest investments in the United States infrastructure of any company, you know, over the last seven to 10 10 years or something to that effect? So it's the carriers, it's the providers, right, that are that are there that, you know, the American towers, I mean, they're the the role they're playing is very important because they're going out and creating the infrastructure for us to place the radios on a deploy. Right. And that's not just with 5g, right. I mean, we were talking earlier, about NB IoT and about LTM, right. I mean, you've got low power use cases, as well, for the technology where you need to have ubiquitous coverage. We've got a we've got a partner, badger meters. We've just done a large deal in Columbia, South Carolina with them. And you know, if you think of the big problems in cities that you can solve for its public safety, so on top of the mayor's list, and then you've got water is always going to be one, and then traffic and transportation, and then economic development. Those are usually the four top areas that a mayor is looking at. And you know, from a badger meter perspective, they've led the charge with cellular in Columbia, South Carolina, we're now going to serve 375,000 residents with meters that are selling connected so that you can monitor flow, you can monitor quality, right, you can monitor loss, and you can start to prevent problems before they become big problems. So,


Jennifer Harder  

I think Mike's hitting on it exactly. There's the idea of building out the infrastructure and building out the backbone and all the really important things that folks like us keep our minds up all night. And then there's the public who doesn't see any of it. They want to see how it works. What can I do with this thing now that it's there, so the leveraging of that investment for all the various different use cases, and we always think of public safety ones, but then there's just citizens as well? How can we leverage that technology to improve everything that we're doing? A lot of times you lay the base work, and then you let those use cases begin to bubble up, because people will creatively come up with all sorts of ways to use now what's available to them. And that's what's so interesting to watch,


Mike Zeto  

right? With the App Store and everything that you're doing with FirstNet. From a product perspective, you're creating an entire force that really you're creating an entire innovation ecosystem on top of that work right. And you need those innovative companies like in our space, the Badgers that are that are changing their business to innovate and to use different technologies to drive the use cases and the value and you guys are doing the same thing with first,


Jennifer Harder  

and then get public safety to take advantage of those use cases and to leverage them in ways that help their operations. I don't necessarily just want public safety to get a lot more tech, I want him to use a lot more tech, how does this make everything work more effectively and efficiently for you? And they're starting to learn? Well, these networks now support me, these networks are here for me. They're mission critical. They're ready for me, what can I do with it that maybe I didn't think I could do before. So I'm looking forward to next year, the use cases are going to go up tremendously for some of these networks that we've got in play now.


Carla Bailo  

Good. So I heard I heard you know, from Mike, the number one thing on a mayor's list of concerns is public safety. So Jen, I wanted to ask you a little bit about public safety, why that's vital for the city's health and economic engine. And then maybe you have some practical examples that you can tell us about.


Jennifer Harder  

Yeah, so a couple of things for us. I think folks to think about Today being an opportunistic day, it's national law enforcement Appreciation Day across the country. So if you think about 2019, we had 134 law enforcement officers who lost their lives of that hundred and 3447 of them were shot. What can we do about that? What technology is exists out there to tell us sooner? If an officer has been shot better if that officer has been shot? How can we increase the response time to get to that officer to save that officer to get them to advance medical care? What about the other 87 the other 87 did not die in the light of duty at the behest of a gun. They died in automobile accidents, heart attacks, health issues. We had more officers well north of 200 in 2019 commit suicide than were murdered in the line of duty. So what are we doing about that? You just start looking at our first responder community. And you think what are we doing to keep them safer and healthier and therefore more effective at keeping us safer and healthier. If our can entities are more resilient. If our law enforcement, our fire agencies are more resilient, they're taking better care of us. They're able to get to us quicker. They're able to get us to advanced medical care quicker, they're able to keep our crime rates lower, which by extension, keep property values up. There's lots of different ways you can look at how helping them ends up helping the community as a whole. One of the more recent examples I bumped into is looking at some of the folks in the Bahamas that went through hurricane Dorian. And we all know that kind of wiped out many of the islands and what they were dealing with, and then we kind of all moved on and we didn't think about it. If you look at resiliency post disaster, one of the most important economic factors is how fast people think it's okay to leave their family and go back to work. If they're still worried about their family, they don't have utilities, they don't have power. They don't have water. They're not going back to their jobs, to make the money they need to buy the food, put their kids in school and to get the economy back up and running. certain areas of the Bahamas since Dorian still don't have schools still don't have banks. Still Have grocery stores that they're able to do. What can we do here in the United States to make sure our resiliency post disaster is a quick turn to keep our economies functioning, and our first responders getting in there and going from a rescue, to recovery, to demobilization to rebuild shortening that timeframe, makes our communities come back up in line faster. So all of those different pieces coming together, puts public safety kind of as a gear in that watch, and makes that thing turn and the faster we turn time, the more resilient we are. So those are the kind of things that we're looking at, and how do we make those improvements sort of along the line? Those are some excellent cases. And it's one of the things that in our research with autonomous vehicles, and connected vehicles, we're thinking how can we do evacuation much better than we currently do it? How can we get people out better because I think we've all seen in these cases where we've had the hurricanes in the flooding, be it in Houston and Florida, just about That traffic trying to come up because we have one person or two people in each car, rather than doing something smarter or officially do exactly what can we do more efficiently? To enable that kind of safety? We always think about public safety folks, for whatever reason, is engaging with us and walking and talking, but they spend dozens of hours a week in a vehicle. Those vehicles don't go the normal speed. They don't always go the normal way. They light up sirens and distractions, and they get an accident. How can we bake that work between autonomous vehicles or piloted vehicles and public safety vehicles? They are the outlier. They're the ones that behave differently. And we do lose responders and citizens every year to accidents involving those vehicles. So there's lots of different ways simple those technologies can help along the way.


Carla Bailo  

Now, we've talked about in the automotive community, truck drivers have, in general, kind of the worst health that we deal with. We've talked about putting wearables and seat fabrics with sensors so that you can sense health. Is that something that the police departments fire departments or others are also talking about


Jennifer Harder  

certainly. So you're definitely seeing an increase in interest in wearables and an increase in health tracking some of the things that we've heard and Mike, you can jump in on this as well, is really about, I want to be assessed as an individual with my health, not given a blanket. So a lot of times we'll hear well, if your heart rate gets above this as a firefighter, we're going to jerk you off the fire line. They don't want to hear that I'm capable of being here. My neighbors capable of being here. You need to monitor us more carefully. You certainly still get the big brother philosophy. I don't know what everybody looking at how I am. But in 2018, I think we lost over 30 firefighters to heart attacks. We have states that are working heavily on all I'm losing as responders to medical issues. I have a state that I work with that doesn't even do bulletproof vests for a lot of the responders because they're more likely to die from heat. It's just very difficult sometimes to balance these things out. Basic wearable technology that all of us have already. What can we do to put that in a form factor that works well in the field for public safety. Is it a huge thing to innovate? Or is it maybe some small changes that would allow us to innovate in that space? So we're trying to work with some of those manufacturers to get some of those ideas going.


Mike Zeto  

And that's and there's policy tied back to that as well. I mean, do we have a strong embedded business? So by embedded, I mean, working with a manufacturer of a device, like a body camera, like axon, and being able to embed the FirstNet sim in there, right. You know, there's challenges around video, right? When do you turn it on holiday? Keep it you know, and there's there's skepticism around it from both sides. Right. So there's, there's a lot of things we have to work through. But at the end of the day, all of this technology can benefit folks in especially our first responders from from a health and safety perspective, because to your point, I mean, if if, if they're not healthy, and they're not safe, then they can't keep us in all of our families safe, right? So you know, it's, it's just in the stress levels that that we see Working with first responders that are just going through the roof, right? So anything we can do to help them monitor that and then manage that. There's programs we can develop them based on, you know, nonprofit programs that we can then develop based on information that the departments have. So that they can confidentially place people into those recommend them to cope with some of that stress, if you will, and some of the health issues that they have.


Carla Bailo  

Let me ask a little provocative question. So we often call putting technology in cities or in vehicles. people's reaction is sometimes tech lash, you know, fear of surveillance, fear of job loss, how do you discuss that with the with the municipalities that you're working with? And do they bring it up as a concern for their citizens and their employees?


Jennifer Harder  

Certainly, we hear it in terms of privacy concerns, and I really don't want every piece of my life being monitored and being evaluated, and it's a matter of Okay, which pieces are you comfortable with based on the risk to benefit If you can get some things without or if you really want that extra benefit, there may be a trade off that goes along with that. But whereas a logical and safe line, I think body worn cameras has become a really good case study in that, that has proliferated fall through the law enforcement community. We're starting to see it more in emfs. And they had more health concerns, HIPAA concerns and that type of thing, right? Where does the balance come between what I really want to be able to capture and video what I really don't want to be able to capture in this video? And then how do we, at the end of the day, avoid digital hoarding, where we collect all this video and we just keep it forever? We don't know what we're doing with all of it. It just sits in the closet like grandma's old China set. How can we begin to work through some of those concerns that we keeping the good stuff, and we're using it for what we want, but we're not blowing past that privacy line and that autonomy line where the responders and the community themselves just don't want to constantly be surveilled. It's a matter of finding where that sweet spot is and back to governance and back to policy. And really, in our case, from our roadmap perspective, And some of the work we do with public safety back to feedback. And talk to us talk to us what those concerns are, how can we work with industry to mitigate those concerns and to make them more real for the responder, so that they're finding where they're comfortable with it? Once we roll?

CTATECH-PROD1