Speaker 

Ladies and gentlemen please welcome to the stage our tech support and natural disaster recovery panel

 
Cindy Stevens 

Hello. So good morning everyone. Thank you for coming today to the ces 2020 tech support and natural discovery panel. I'm Cindy Stevens. I am the senior editor of publications for the consumer Technology Association and I'm also editor in chief of our magazine it is innovation. So, let's go ahead and get started. Many people unfortunately, each year are injured or killed and natural disasters. Fires notably recent places in California and the current fires and also Australia, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods and earthquakes are just a few of the calamities excuse me, that can negatively impact people without warning. Rescue teams and aid agencies often rely on technology to conduct rescue missions and help those who have been affected. Now new technologies are being used to fast track disaster relief efforts improving the efficiency and effectiveness of first responders, further deepening the role played by technology and disaster aid relief. For instance, drones and robots can locate survivors and transmit information to emergency teams. They can also drop humanitarian aid to areas that are impossible to reach by other means. The good news is that fatalities and injuries from natural disasters can be reduced if the disaster can be predicted and advanced warning given to people in a danger zone. Today we will talk about some of the innovative ways to accelerate recovery in the wake of natural disasters. We have experts from various parts of the industry. With us who will weigh in on the tech that can help to pave the way to recovery, we'll look at some of the opportunities and challenges of incorporating tech into disaster recovery processes. We have an impressive group of panelists with us today. I will briefly introduce each of them before we jump into our discussion. Unfortunately, a Dr. Daniel kunitsky, the Deputy Administrator of resilience for FEMA was unable to travel to see CES. However, we are fortunate to have with us Andre Hence, the Acting Deputy Deputy Undersecretary for science and technology for the US Department of Homeland Security works closely with FEMA and all of the DHS components to accelerate technology solutions for their mission operations. Andre join science and technology in 2014 leading programs that address emerging threats in the Homeland Security landscape. In 2016. He spearheaded the department's Rapid Reaction team on counter unmanned aerial systems established to help homeland security officials counter nefarious drone use and help identify solutions for federal government agencies. His expertise and next generation technologies and capability development has brought smart and connected solutions to fruition in areas that include artificial intelligence, biometrics, and next generation sensors. This work has expanded collaborative r&d efforts by the DHS security Silicon Valley innovation program, and the University Centers of Excellence. Our next panelist, Shari korkin, is Senior Vice President for push payments and new payment platforms at MasterCard. She has spent more than 20 years developing successful global scale products and platforms in the financial services industry. She's responsible for the product strategy, platform development and commercialization of MasterCard send an interoperable global platform that enables secure, near real time payment transfers to and from billions of card, bank and digital accounts around the world. With MasterCard said businesses, governments, humanitarian organizations financial institution and others can send money to consumers and small businesses domestically and cross border in seconds. Our next panelist, john Lawson, is the executive director of the advanced warning and Response Network Alliance, the international coalition of broadcasting, consumer electronics and professional tech companies. The Alliance is leveraging next generation television called ATSC three Dotto to develop an advanced system for emergency alerts, news and information. He is also president of convergent Systems Inc, a consulting firm focused on spectrum resilience next gen TV business models and the intelligent transportation industry. JOHN has worked extensively with FEMA was also an expert panelists at the White House earthquake resilience summit. He began his work on advanced alerting while CEO of the Association of Public Television Stations starting the 911 attacks. And finally, last but not least, We have john michelly, who is Senior Vice President of claims of centralized services at Allstate Insurance Company. JOHN oversees approximately 5000 domestic and offshore resources encompassing that catastrophe, special investigate unit digital operating center, subrogation Express call center, and claims workflow groups. During is more than 30 years at Allstate, john has helped with field and home office positions, primarily in the areas of finance and strategy. He began his career in the New York Region taking on increasing responsibility across many parts of the organization. And today he is going to share with us the work that all state is doing in this area. So let's just go ahead and jump in. And as the first question, can each of you briefly explain what role your team plays in the cross section of disaster and technology, or technology and disaster recovery? and Andre, we can start with you. Yeah, thank you very much. And first of all,

 
Andre Hentz 

I'd like to say hello to everybody here. The room thanks for attending the session, and I look forward to a very robust discussion with you today. So at DHS science and technology, we are the primary research and development part of the Department of Homeland Security. And to that extent, we work with our other operational components such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency to better understand what their challenges are in their operational mission sets. And what we do visa v those challenges is we develop robust research and development roadmaps that help them close the section, the sectors, inability to respond to either natural or man made disaster with technical solutions that's either going to save a life drop down cost, enhance our abilities to survive in the wake of some of these disasters. So what we try to do is we try to establish a robust innovation community, which brings us out here to places like CES that's going to make those consumer tools for the purposes of making our lives better. But also what we try to do is ensure that the security and resilience that is built into those systems gets translated into our operational end users. So that's my primary objective. And I'm here today to talk to you guys about what our problems are, and how I can learn from you guys to better refine our r&d portfolio. And hopefully, see if any of you guys in the audience can ultimately be a solutions provider to the Department of Homeland Security. So thanks for having me.

 
Shari Krikorian 

Great. Hi there. So at MasterCard, we are committed to a principle of doing well by doing good. Now we don't actually deliver the aid or the services directly. We are a b2b to see technology company and we provide enabling technologies through partners through partners like Allstate, who's joining me on the stage here. Now the innovative technology that I look after something called MasterCard send. And MasterCard send is a payment solution that like its name sends money, it sends money to consumers or small businesses typically within seconds. You know, we're all familiar with payments where consumers buy, but MasterCard said you can think of it as like the reverse of that transaction. So the money is actually flowing in the opposite direction. So we've partnered with partners like Allstate. And the example that I'd like to talk about is how we've enabled all state to be able to deliver emergency insurance claims rapidly to their beneficiaries. And the way it works is that they send the money to the bank account via the debit card, and the money arrives, typically within seconds. And what better way to illustrate this for you than to show you a video so let's take a look.

 
(video audio) 

Allstate has been helping families protect their assets. For over 80 years, and now by partnering with MasterCard to use its payments technology service, all state can pay claims in near real time introducing quick card paid from all state. Simply give your claims adjuster the desire debit card number, and after the claim is approved, funds are deposited to your bank account, typically within seconds. Quick card pay is already making a real difference out in the world. Last fall, I was driving home from work and I got rear ended. I mean, I wasn't hurt. But my rear bumper wasn't so lucky. But the real problem was that in two days, I was supposed to drive out to be my girlfriend's family for the first time. So I needed this fixed, like immediately. I use the app to take pictures and an adjuster had an estimate ready for my approved claims. hours later. He asked if I wanted to use quick card pay. So I said yes, and gave him my debit card number. I checked A few seconds later and Money was in my account. I did get the car fixed in time, thanks to the whole process being so seamless.

 
(video audio) 

I'd never seen wins so strong in my life trees were bent over sideways. So I wasn't surprised when I saw that all of these branches had fallen onto our roof. I found a claim right away because I was afraid to smell a mountain leak into the attic. Thanks to quick hard pay. We got our payment days before the rest of the neighborhood, which meant I could schedule repairs before the local roofers got over booked. A few days later, I was completely fixed.

 
(video audio) 

What you don't realize about natural disasters is that there might not be an address to mail a check to a policyholder and his family could be stranded in an emergency shelter somewhere with quick card pay. I can get money for food, hotels and clothing to as many customers as possible quickly typically within seconds With all states sending funds right into their bank accounts, breakthrough services like quick card pay, or just one of the many reasons why customers know they're in good hands with Allstate.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Great, thank you. JOHN, do you want to tell us a little bit about your

 
John Lawson 

work? Thank you. It's an honor to be here with you today. So the climate is changing as we know or the severity and frequency of natural disasters is increasing manmade disasters aren't going away. To survive as a species we have to adapt something we're good at. And part of that adaption is to improve the way we communicate both before during and after disaster strikes. I believe it's going to take a partnership of government and the private sector to innovate, to provide better communications for the for the various public's This is an international issue. I happen to be the executive director of a coalition of technology broadcasting and consumer electronics companies that is taking advantage of a new over the air TV technology. This is not experimental. Its commercial off the shelf. There are announcements at this show about next gen TV sets. There's a station on the air here at Black Mountain. And next gen is coming and it's It was developed by the US and Korean companies, they use it in Korea for the Winter Olympics. But we can do a lot more with it. We can 3.0 we call it our next gen TV allows us to send messages that penetrate penetrate to a whole range of consumer devices deep indoors, to TV sets to connected cars to mobile devices. And we're going to use this system to provide two capabilities that did a lot of our systems today lack. America has a very fragmented alerting system, it works well in some places not so well and others. We've had fatalities. We've had some good outcomes from the recent floods and hurricanes and, and fires but we have to do a better job. One of the biggest problems with alerting is over alerting people get desensitized to the alerts if the alert is made, and they don't, it doesn't happen, something it doesn't happen. So we're going to geo target very well think ways. And we're going to provide rich media. Social science tells us that Contrary to popular belief, people typically do not panic and emergencies. It happens but the more normal responses people actually pull together, and they treat each other better in an emergency than they do in day to day life. But they do delay action and they delay action. To look for more information to look for verification, they call it and milling. And by providing rich information, evacuation routes, shelter locations, can you drink the water, we believe that we can cut down on milling and improve the experience. So we're going to provide not only alerting but the post is that post event information for people to recovery to recover.

 
John Micheli 

As you can imagine, a natural disaster. Whether you're one of the Allstate customers or one of anyone that's lived through it is sometimes the most traumatic experience people have have experienced at all state technology is one of the tools we use. It's one of the tools in our toolbox to help keep people restore their lives to get them on the road to recovery. We do this through as you saw quick card pay, getting funds to people so they can get either temporary housing so they can pay for food they paid for clothing. We do this to make sure we've got the right boot On the ground, we have about 800 people that actually dedicated to go out and actually help people in times of, of disaster. And also for communication, we make sure that we stay in contact with our customers, because it is such a traumatic experience. So those three facets are really what we're all about and how technology plays in and helping your insurance company.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, so during a disaster, having the right information communicated quickly is crucial. So how can people get the latest updates? What is the best way for them in this situation?

 
John Lawson 

Well, today we have two major alerting capabilities. One is the is the Emergency Alert System. This literally goes back to the Cold War to the earliest days. It was designed for one thing, and that's for the president, the United States to alert the public in case of nuclear attack. that's never been used. Fortunately, I don't know what the President would have said except kiss you or something. Goodbye. But that system is still there. And we're not replacing it. But it's a blunt instrument. It's rarely used because it's, it doesn't geo target. If there's a flash flood in one little corner of a, of a coverage area of a of a TV market, the station it's all voluntary except for that presidential or they have to decide Am I going to interrupt the game to alert people in that little neck of the, of the market. And so it's rarely used the the innovation that came out after 911 was the wireless Emergency Alert System. This is a non mandate mandate on the wireless carriers. You've all gotten these. You typically see it as an amber over and it's 90 characters. They're there. They're expanding, but there's been a lot of social science, a lot of research done by s&t excellent work around we we strongly support we are but you need more information. People need to get more information. So what we have today is a adhoc system. It performed superbly in the fires around Los Angeles and in Southern California. But it failed in paradise people died it failed in Napa and Sonoma in 2017. So we're trying we need, we need a, we need a system that is more of a overlay of a network of networks. And I think that what we're going to be able to provide with next gen TV and a warren will, will be able to do that.

 
Cindy Stevens 

So can you talk a little bit about the test that the presidential alert test that was performed like a year ago, and if there were lessons learned from that?

 
John Lawson 

So the EEA, the wireless emergency, the EAS is tested. Do you hear that this is a test only a test. We I had never been tested for an emergency alert. And in October, the White House FEMA actually Andres counterparts issued an alert through the wireless system and ironically, I was asked by the New York Times and other outlets to comment on the need for this system. There was a lot of pushback on the internet that this was just a way for people to have to listen to have to respond to a tweet from President Trump. When in fact, it wasn't that it was that needed tasks. I was accused of being a Trump students were defending it. But we actually needed to test this system. And I hope we test it regulates and so we I don't know, Andre, I think it was generally considered a success. We were in the 70%. Reception.

 
Andre Hentz 

Yeah, for for those in the federal government. It hit, of course, all of our devices. And based on the feedback that we've received, there was a lot of positive response. Like you said, the need for the public private partnership, and to have that kind of apparatus that's going to touch both the private sector as well as the government infrastructure is something that a private wouldn't wouldn't need at its disposal. So we certainly found it to be successful.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Great. Okay. And Andre, maybe you can tell us a little bit about how FEMA and s&t are educating the public.

 
Andre Hentz 

Right. Thank you, Cindy. I think it starts with what we're doing right now. It begins with us, the federal government, finding ourselves in front of the innovation community, to one articulate the need for the partnership. You are creating consumer tools that ultimately we're going to be expected to interface into, as our first responders, responding your cities and towns. Were going to be locking in and taking advantage of the innovations that are out there that you've created. So in order for us to really expand a greater understanding for why it is that the federal government is out at CES? Well, it's because we understand that the creativity comes from you guys. What we need to do is a better job of Partnering with you on terms that you better understand and to giving you enriched problem sets that help you architect and design safety and security and resilience into the system based on the information that we get to see on the federal edge. And then we we further go into the university infrastructure, both as a government agency to let the next generation of leaders in the federal sector know more about where emerging problems are occurring, and what the innovation community can do visa v those problem sets. At the end of the day, we try to outreach into the community by letting you know that we need a robust industrial base that is responsive and agile to our problem sets and that there is a market in the federal government for the innovation that you're here at CES to provide.

 
Shari Krikorian 

I just wanted to touch on the on the data question and also how it intersects with Our partnership actually with FEMA. So at MasterCard as a global network, and our ability to monitor transaction data, we're able to gather insights about an infected area, which merchants or which ATMs might actually be active and being used. So for example, we can see if a gas station or a hotel or a grocery store, a pharmacy or an ATM might be open. And we have something very critical and in times of crises, and so we have a group called the fusion center and they're able to collect this data and of course, they that's anonymized and aggregated, but we can provide it within 24 hours or less. Actually, I think they're down to an hour excuse me to be able to provide it to FEMA who can provide it to the first responders so that they can help those affected know where they might be able to get a hotel or medicine or food or gas. So just a way to be able to support the innovation. That you're talking about to be able to provide information to those who are affected.

 
Andre Hentz 

That's a great point. Sherry brings up because oftentimes what goes unseen is the cascading effect on on, you know, resilience. Whenever something is happening, we think about it in terms of being a localized problem. But in reality, it's the cascading effect that ultimately leads to an inability to be resilient. And so those types of partnerships are critical for us and we appreciate the partnership.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, great. And john WeMo ATSC, three dot o be available.

 
John Lawson 

So it's, it's being launched right now. 2020 is the year where, where the broadcaster's ever committed to have at least 40. Markets on the air with 3.0. These will be simulcast with our current system, which is called ATSC. One point O is what we call it now. It was the standard that ushered in High Definition Television to the to the United States. Now we have this third generation digital system. And not only are stations watching, but both I think I know LG and Samsung, and I think Sony as well have announced to this show that they're going to put 3.0 next gen TV sets on the market this year later this year. We see 2020 as a pivotal year for really deciding the business model for next gen. And also deciding, determining how exactly we're going to use that for advanced emergency alerting and messaging. I mean, the great news is that the broadcasting infrastructure is already in place. We're not building new towers and buying new transmitters for this generally. It's just a question of of using I as as Andre said, The federal government has to rely upon private sector infrastructure to get out emergency information. Like the carriers and the wireless alerts. So fortunately, the commercial development of next gen TV is proceeding. And I think in terms of consumer impact, I think most people will probably have a chance to experience it in 2021.

 
Cindy Stevens 

And can you talk a little bit about some of the capabilities that make it different and how, what exactly is data casting?

 
John Lawson 

So, when first generation digital TV was watched in the 2000s, remember, we used to have analog and we turned that off in 2009. Our Japanese colleagues invented High Definition TV, I'm very proud that some of our members from Japan are with us today. To do it with American TVs signal we had to invent digital TV. To do that. To do high definition, it meant we sort of gave up indoor reception with 3.0 We're gonna bring back indoor reception. Not only will I do HD, it'll do 4k TV. A single station could do say 4k channel and multiple high definition channels, some could be free, some can be subscription, and then data casting. I mean, it's all ones and zeros. If you look at just the connected car, the whole connected car infrastructure or depends upon very short range communications. Those short range systems are subject to hacking over congestion, grid failure, with 3.0. From a single tower, we can push out massive amounts of data to say a million cars, every car in a market. So that's data casting, it's a way to distribute. It could be a movie, it could be a deal with Netflix for the premiere of a major motion picture we're going to use with the air whereas they'll use The internet for on demand, it could be servicing the Internet of Things. So it's very important to not think of next generation TV. Our ATSC 3.0 is just a TV thing. It'll certainly be used for television but it is the world's first all IP system. And to me the most powerful feature of three oh is that that this signal over the air can be received and totally integrated with 5g with broadband with connected cars. It creates a whole new ecosystem.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Create and switching gears a little bit john, how does all state get how do you get your customers prepared for emergencies and, and disasters?

 
John Micheli 

It is often and any way we can and and that ranges from push notifications on the app or one 800 we have a local real estate agent. We do notifications pre, during and post, we use a lot of geospatial data to figure out where storms are going to hit. So we even use things such as billboards, TV advertising, publication advertising. So you know, when there is a natural disaster, you can't over communicate, you can't do enough. And we use a multitude of media in order to do that.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, and probably is this for Sherry, too. So when a homeowner is going through a really difficult situation, how do you communicate with them and keep that line open? You know?

 
Shari Krikorian 

I'll let john go first and then I'll follow up since you're probably communicating directly with the homeowner

 
John Micheli 

we do it not not to repeat myself, but the Allstate agent, local estate agent is usually at the forefront of a lot of this, but not everybody thinks of contacting their real estate agent. So we do have people that have the app and most of our customers do you have the app will actually ping them prior to storms and actually instruct them how to download the app and we'll send push notifications, those notifications could be where the storms going to hit, where our Mr. Use our mobile response units, big Winnebago type mobile claims units might be so they can go and report a claim. And even some of the local data, which shelters might be open, what roads might be closed, we utilize a lot of the public data and we try to get that to our customers as soon as enough often as possible, right.

 
Shari Krikorian 

And, and as I was saying, you know, MasterCard, we are a B to B to C company, which means we do not sell directly to consumers. We sell through our partners like all states, but what we want to do is provide the enabling technologies that make it a little bit easier for all state to deliver the service to the consumer. So if you've got a homeowner who's been in a hurricane and a tree has fallen on the roof, and the adjuster comes and you know, could offer a check yesterday, but there's no bank open to go take the check too, and that consumer needs to take his family to a hotel. And now a new option is to be able to send the funds instantly to the bank account via the debit card, which is a which is a choice that I think many of your consumers do take. And then the money's actually there instantly. And they have this confidence of knowing they've got the money and they can now go and take their family to the hotel and such. So it's this kind of not just the ease of use, but the sort of the confidence of knowing that you have the money that you need when you need it the most.

 
John Micheli 

The quick card pay function has been a real game changer for us to give you an idea of how often you will use it. About 50 to 53% of our customers receive digital payments of that 52 plus percent 43% of the 52 is actually print card pay. And many times while we have the the the insured on the phone, they actually see the funds appear in their their account as you could imagine. In times of natural disasters, people don't know where to go. They need money. They need alternative living arrangements to get them the money to be the lifeblood, if you will, during these times, it's really what we're all about to get them on the road to recovery. So that's really important for

 
Cindy Stevens 

so is the agent, the one that sort of educates consumers, because they probably aren't aware of it before a disaster, right? So let's see the one that tells them about the

 
John Micheli 

it is a stuff it's the agent, it's the claim reps, it's the one 800 number, it's the social media will use Facebook or Twitter, or what have you, in order to get out. Like I said, there's really not there's nothing off limits when people when there's a natural disaster.

 
Shari Krikorian 

I mean, I can give another example, which is with another partner of ours, American Red Cross, and this is going back to Hurricane Harvey, in Houston. And they had all of the all of these folks that were in these huge, you know, arenas, they're sort of shelters, and how to get them the aid that they needed, and So what they did is they set up some terminals, computer terminals, and the consumer could go and type in their address. And if their zip code and address and name match that they were actually eligible for this aid, then they could provide their debit card credential, and they were able to get their money right away. So as a way to be able to get the money to those folks when they need it right away is just an example and illustrative example of how our partners are able to educate the consumers about how one option of getting the aid that they need, right that's a lifesaver and an emergency. I'm

 
John Lawson 

sure. It speaks to one of the use cases for what we're designing. Were the advanced warning and Response Network. After the disaster. You need to push out all sorts of information to people in a situation like Sandy for the infrastructure and sell your was wiped out for weeks. We have TV stations that are extremely robust. They're the most survivable infrastructure, they all have backup power. If they were able to send this information out to people with battery powered devices handheld or in the home or in the car that you could all state and MasterCard could push out information about it, about how people can recover. Walmart we were talking about Walmart and and Lowe's and Home Depot are the de facto logistics supply agencies for the, for the government and for the US after disasters. Push out the information where do you get the generators for Do you find the tarps? It's just it's a life. It's we have to think about this as a as a lifeline service. One of our we get a lot of support from aapko, which represents the 911 call centers. They like what we're doing because they have a problem. They have their own name for it. It's called t das telephony denial of service where after an event, they are inundated with calls from people. Not that my husband's having a heart attacks in an ambulance. But where do I find clean water? When can I get back in my neighborhood? Is the highway still closed? If we can push out that kind of information, then it it leaves the capacity, the bandwidth of the call centers for real emergencies. I think that's when we when you talk about data casting, it's really reaching out and with new ways to to provide information that people need. After the after the thing happens as well.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Andre, can you expand a little bit more about the importance of partnerships and how maybe give an example of how a partnership has helped in the past?

 
Andre Hentz 

Sure. This example that we're talking about right now, we're between MasterCard and Allstate and the innovation community is is key. to that very question, the way that we would want to take advantage it's not necessarily that we're going to have the same use case but what It about the underlying methodology that translates into the problem sets that ultimately the Homeland Security departments going to have. And I'll give you an example, in elkridge, Maryland, which is just to the north of DC. One of our initiatives is to provide low cost Internet of Things sis sensors, to elkridge, Maryland. In the past several years, they've had these 200 year floods that have hit the city of elkridge been devastating. And so what we're trying to do is using the consumer tools that you guys are developing, low cost Internet of Things, sensors to alert city managers and other first response providers to when water levels are rising, and that time is critical of their canoes ski was sitting here he would draw a line directly to famous need to pay out a claim, but to the extent that a first responder or city manager can either give the old to evacuate, or say, you know what shelter in place, either or that critical information is going to be extremely important to that decision making tree. And so to hear this discussion around the velocity of technology where MasterCard is innovating in the space and partnership, those understandings of where industry is going means that the risk has been bought down. Now, what our job is at DHS, is to understand how does that risk by down translate to the mission objectives that I have at s&t? And how can I partner to bring some of those offerings to the Homeland Security enterprise? And so that's really the importance of the relationship.

 
Cindy Stevens 

And can you all talk a little bit about some of the things that we had had massive fires in California and maybe some examples of how you know technology was used, you know, after these disasters

 
John Micheli 

for For us at all state, we had a lot of learnings with the fires, it was an extremely devastating event, very concentrated event. But one of the things, there's some of the learnings we got out of it was the use of both aerial and satellite technology. We utilize that more during the camp fires than than anywhere else. Quite frankly, once the, you know, a lot of the areas were unreachable. We couldn't get in there. So we use a lot of fixed wing aircraft, who's led a satellite to figure out both pre and post what what the damage might be so that when people were calling us, we already knew what was going on. We already knew the devastation we knew to the extent that their claims needed needed to be adjusted. So that was really that was really a big learning for us. It was, like I said, extremely devastating, but there were a lot of learnings out of it. That will probably leverage and then we'll keep moving as as we go forward.

 
John Lawson 

Yeah, same with I mean hard lessons to learn. But if you go back to 2017, massive fires in Northern California, Napa and Sonoma County's did not send a wireless emergency alert. And their reasoning was that the fires are moving so fast. Their situational awareness was so poor, that and their geotargeting they couldn't count on the geotargeting that they were concerned about sending a lot of people out onto the highways who don't need to be evacuating other counties and they lost people. other counties send the alert, they didn't lose people. Is there a correlation? Yes, causality. I don't know. But we had the same situation. 2019 paradise never got the award. They got wiped out. Other areas did it. I personally am greatly impressed by the recent fires. I mean, it's hard to talk about recent because they seem to be continuous. But around Los Angeles and as in wine country, there was a great ad hoc ad hoc network of communications that prevented as far as I know, any fatalities from those horrific fires. And so there, there are foundations we can build on. One thing I've learned is that between the emergency managers and their local TV news stations are very deep informal relationships. These people know each other, and they work together around around events like that. We've got the wireless system. I think what we're learning is not only do we need a new system, or our additional systems to reach people wherever they are, including in their cars, but we need better situational awareness about the about the fires, and there's some good news there as I understand it, that then Satellite from NOAA, as well as private sector satellites, and big data analytics are giving the first responders much better tools and predicting where the fire is going to go. So that the, if you can couple that to a much better wording system that geo targets very selectively, we're going to have a big improvement in, in saving lives and a lot of property.

 
Shari Krikorian 

Sorry, did you wanna add on? I don't have any direct comments. Hello.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, and what is the role of like drones in maybe surveying damage after a disaster has occurred or looking for survivors or delivering aid? Are you all involved with that or had experienced there?

 
John Micheli 

Yeah, all states been at the forefront of drone technology for the settlement and the establishment of claims. That's probably about three four years ago. We really started to take Get into and dip our toe in the water into drone technology. As you can imagine, and I think I mentioned this before, trying to get into see homes due to debris, maybe it's weather issues, some roads might be closed, you know, we can't start the recovery process, the use of drones has actually changed that we're able to get drones in there to take a look at rooves or take a look at foundations or what have you. So we next in an essence is an extension of what the adjuster can do so we can get our folks back on on the road to recovery. Some of the some of the resolution is not as good as we'd like right now. But I don't know if it has to be from an initial perspective, we need to know a ballpark of what we're dealing with so that we can get the funds to the people so they can set the claims up so we can get them you know, either additional living accommodations. That's really what it's about, but it's been a real game changer. And as the technology in terms of imagery gets better Drones only get better. So it's been a real game changer for you, Andre, I know you've been pretty active in that area as well, right?

 
Andre Hentz 

Yeah, I would say, if Dan Kaminsky were here, he would certainly for all same references back to john and the need for drone technology in a sensing and understanding situational awareness perspective, oftentimes during a natural disaster, what you'll see in the federal government is the deployment of say a helicopter asset or something like that, which is very expensive and oftentimes cost prohibitive. But with the advent of very sophisticated drone technology, we are looking at whether or not it would be feasible to adopt some of this commercial technology so that if there were a flood, or a hurricane or any type of natural man made disaster, would it be easier to get a very low cost? asset on station to better assess damage and start to triage the process. So yeah, absolutely. And I think we are certainly behind industry, I think industries out in front of us and probably should be, but we certainly have those same use cases.

 
Cindy Stevens 

And also, what is the role of like data and analytics after like when, when a disaster has happened? How does that how is that being used to like predict or or help inform the next time there's a response to a disaster?

 
Andre Hentz 

Yeah, so you were talking about the the California fire situation we have a very robust partnership with callfire. And oftentimes, where the value arises is in many areas of technology, one, modeling and simulation. Oftentimes, we can provide modeling and simulation tools that in the you know, after an event that will further enrich our understanding of how fires move and behave. But also in terms of training first responders And how to deal with the fire. And so there's simulation environments, there's virtual reality. There's all types of tools that we bring to the fight, to better help the first responders and critical mission incident responders, understand what the threats are and train against those to better preserve life as they go forward. Unfortunately, there's the other side of the equation that when there is unfortunately a fatality, we also develop technical solutions that can map quickly DNA of victims and attribute who they are to help that those families bring closure to that as quickly as possible as well. So we have a very broad mission, but with the innovation we're talking about up here, we think we're moving the ball forward.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, and what are how would you each define resilience? Because it's kind of a it's a big area, and it's hard to kind of, you know, for a lot of people to understand exactly what it is. Anyone want to go first?

 
John Micheli 

I'll take a sec. At all state you know, we try to protect and prepare people from life's uncertainties. If they do happen to have one of these uncertainties. To me resilience is the ability to recover quickly. How quick can we get people back on their feet? How how quick can we get people back to their normal lives? So to me resilience is you can define it as the ability how quick and how easily we can get people back to to normalcy it's great. chanted

 
John Lawson 

Yeah, resilience to me. It it's what I think the resilience I think of Japan, and I'm not just saying it because my Japanese members are here. This is a country that's lived with disaster, earthquakes and tsunamis and they had a horrific typhoon. Just couple months ago now, they had an equivalent in 1958 that killed about 12,000 people. This one, they've lost 80 over 80. The ability to, to plan to plan for the disaster. I mean, I, to me, resilience is about being smart about what's happening in our world. I mean, things are getting worse, Australia. It breaks our hearts. Yeah, but let's get used to it, you know, it's going to keep happening. Are we smart about it, having the ability in my in our case? Can we innovate enough to communicate well about it? Can we? I mean, how if something bad happens on the west coast in the way of a seismic event, or do you rehouse all of those people, and there's a lot of private sector activity, I know there's going to be announcement here with CTA and the World Bank about a global challenge around innovation. As I understand that Airbnb has done a lot of things about reality people after a major event. That's what we're talking we're talking about innovation. We're talking about people having the grit. I mean, there's there's a model of resilience that I like. Resilience used to be having 14 days of water and having fresh batteries and having a half a tank of gas at all times in your car. FEMA zone surveys indicate almost none of us do that. But there's a model of resilience that a professor at North Dakota State articulated at a FEMA event I attended. And it was resilience comes down to it comes down to social integration. If you have to evacuate you have a place to go to. And as someone remember the senior citizen down the street in terms of needing a boat. Secondly, do you have the technological capability to connect with that social network and to connect with the authorities, you have the ability to receive information about where you should evacuate to and when you can get back in your home. And the third, the third leg of this stool as she describes it. This is Dr. Jessica Jensen, is just the physical and mental adaptive capability of individuals. That's the one that I worry about most, because America's Health Statistics are not good. The trends are not good. We're actually experiencing longer brother shorter lifespans. Now, the ability just to physically deal with these and mentally deal with these, these events is is is key. And I, to me, the model of resilience has to look at all three of those things.

 
Shari Krikorian 

So at the end of the day, it's all about you know, helping real people get their lives back on track and MasterCard sits in sort of a unique situation because as I've said, you know, we're not directly helping the consumer but we've Feel that we have a responsibility with our technology and our expertise and our data to be able to empower our partners, whether it's Allstate or American Red Cross or FEMA, to empower them to be able to help consumers and communities recover more quickly. And so through our enabling technology through our data analytics, and through the development of some very important partnerships, it's all about helping communities and people recover more quickly.

 
Andre Hentz 

And I think all of that is is spot on. The only thing I would add to that resilience definition. Maybe because some the federal government and where DHS is resilience has also the ability to continue operations in the midst of those catastrophic events. We obviously got to bounce back and recover. But I would say that for us resilience is the ability that under extreme duress to continue operations to continue saving lives. While the catastrophic events are taking taking place.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, let's see if open it up to the audience. Does anyone have any questions that you'd like to ask our panelists are okay? There's the microphone right over here fee, or either side, actually.

 
Kate Riley 

Hi, I'm Kate Riley with America's public television stations. It's good to see you all. And thanks for talking about this important topic. I think one of the things we're hearing is that during disasters, lots of our normal communication systems tend to fail at least for a period of time. And one of the things I was thinking about as john was talking about data casting and ATSC three, is really how data casting can help fill that void both for first responders and for the public. And one way of doing that, in my mind would be to have the ATSC three chip in all of our mobile devices. I'm just one Wondering if the panel has any thoughts. I mean, that's there's clearly many steps to get to that point. But in terms of the functionality, both for the first responder and the government agencies who are trying to be resilient in the midst of the disaster, and also for the consumer to get that information, even if say their power has been shut off in California due to the fires. So just wondering, any thoughts around that?

 
Andre Hentz 

I think very, very interesting. We've always had a need to enhance communications during disasters, I think we have to strike the balance as the federal government between trying to to drive a particular industrial outcome versus the need to be the government. But here's what I know, to the extent that we can take advantage of TV white space that's not being used in a disaster time to better communicate with our citizens. If that means a chip in a device or a antenna on a building, whatever that is, we're going to be all for it so long as it comports with With our operational mission, so you have spot on.

 
John Lawson 

Thanks for the question, Kate. And congratulations to all the great work that you and your colleagues that America's public television stations are doing around first responder communications. To me, that would be it would be a real home run. If someday in the near future, Americans would have a smartphone that could receive the wireless alert through their carrier and an alert from ATSC. Three from their television station. There's a very basic business reasons that that's problematic. The carriers aren't wild about their competitors, the broadcasters, at least in terms of content, being able to put free content on your smartphone. However, the colleagues in South Korea have launched using three Oh, just a couple of months ago, they launched an alert system. They're doing it for they're using three to reach the data cast to outdoor displays. But they probably will lead the way in of convergence with the the smartphone and the carrier signal and the over the air. It could be that it wording is the way that with a little nudge from the government where we do not advocate mandates, but it is a wording is such a clear benefit for the public, that it might be the the catalyst as the innovation continues to finally achieve some some level of conversions at least a consumer offering for people if they want devices like that.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, are there other questions? Okay, we have one over here.

 
John Lawson 

Just to finish follow up on that. I think the car is going to lead it, Kate. I think the the the it'll be it'll be led by the public sector side, who will say the thrill needs to be connected cars because we need to be able to reach all those vehicles in emergencies.

 
Speaker 

Hi, my name is rubber Reinhardt. And I'm a certain number in my local community, Long Beach, California. And obviously, I'm in the tech sector. So I was wondering if you've ever heard of any collaborations between you have utilities, gas, electric water, and they all have sensors and smart cities have had their sensors. But after a major event, like for example, a slip on the Newport Englewood fault in my city, would be far more catastrophic than major slip on the San Andreas. Have you heard of any collaboration where that aggregate data could be fed in real time, where you could then maybe see a mapping or a picture where you've had your worst impacts that make sense

 
Andre Hentz 

at least that At the federal level, between both our Federal Emergency Management Agency and our cyber security infrastructure security agency, so we have these fusion centers that are at the cert edge around critical infrastructure. And what happens in those fusion centers is data gets aggregated and then redistributed to the community of end users in the affected areas. To the extent that it is near real time, I believe we've seen some of that. But that is a kind of a partnership that has grown over time. And I'm sure that there's a need for enhanced engineering and other design that can better illuminate you know, in real time, more like what MasterCard does in its business equity. So we've seen some of it, but I don't know that we are completely as efficient as Effective as industry is right now. Thank you.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, any other questions? So all right. Well, I will ask one fine. Oh, we have one over here. Okay. Yeah,

 
Speaker 

just just a question. I'm Steve Schubert from Newbridge marketing group. And we see a lot of really good consumer packaged goods efforts, but their solo efforts from individual companies. It's great to see the collaboration between federal and federal government and, and private enterprises as well as across MasterCard, and all state. I'm curious, is there do you see good examples of collaboration across when I think about the financial world, in the communication world, but with companies that provide basic supplies, consumer packaged goods, you know, that we see during the sell out there we see lows, so the retailers as well as the manufacturers, do you see an opportunity for better collaboration, both with the federal government and And also with financial enterprises.

 
Andre Hentz 

So as the federal guy on stage, what I see oftentimes is really more so logistical challenges, rather than the ability to actually procure the resources. So, oftentimes we'll see during a natural disaster, there will be, you know, conex boxes of life saving supplies, that due to on the ground logistical issues, that are a direct function of that natural disaster that precludes those supplies and services from being delivered. So I think, yes, there is an opportunity for enhanced collaboration in the space, to the extent that we can figure out how when our infrastructures degraded and big trucks can't get there, and there's not a helicopter available, what are those other solutions that may come from the innovation space that will allow the surplus to get delivered. So I think it's a very good question. But I think yes, the short answer is yes, there is opportunity for enhanced.

 
Shari Krikorian 

And I would just add that the same predictive data that I was talking about before the transaction data, we're able to use that data to help merchants maybe not the consumer packaged goods companies, but the merchants themselves. So the Lowe's and the Home Depot's anticipate what kinds of consumer packaged goods that consumers will need to buy so that they can stock up in advance before the disaster happens.

 
Cindy Stevens 

Okay, great. Well, thank you all looks like we're out of time. But thank you all very much for participating on today's panel. We really appreciate it. Thanks.

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