Speaker 

Ladies and gentlemen please welcome Brian moon

 
Brian Moon 

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to CES 2020 I am Brian Moon Vice President of Sales and Business Development at the Consumer Technology Association and it is my distinct honor to introduce Mayor Won Soon Park of Seoul, Seoul has been ranked number one in the global e governance surveys seven consecutive times. South Korea has the highest internet penetration in the world and soul is the first city to launch 5g network and is actively utilizing 5g to service his residents. Mayor Park has successfully provided various digital services to the residents of Seoul, and he wants to share his experience with you today. Please join me in welcoming Mayor Park to the stage.

 
Won Soon Park 

Brian, thank you for your kind introduction. British economist John Maynard Keynes once said, "The difficulty lies not in the new ideas, but in escaping from the old ones. new challenges and new changes should be filled with new ideas." It is undeniable that the fourth industrial revolution is a reality faced by countries and cities all around the world, science technologies are bringing unprecedented changes to our society at rapid pace, big data and artificial intelligence are reshaping the global industry or landscape. For instance, most of the leading companies in the autonomous vehicle industry are the it forms with artificial intelligence technologies. Now to traditional car makers in the arrow, continuous changes brought by the evolution of technology. How should we incorporate the fourth industrial revolution technologies into city or the administration, institutionalize them and incorporate them into urban life. This is the question post two cities in the world. And I believe that the answer lies in a smart city, smart cities our aims to achieve people centered, sustainable innovations to take the all of yours. Technology is valuable when used for the sake of human beings, therefore, sold for innovation in public services, to better the quality of citizens lives. From the citizens perspective and have a view smart infrastructure. The Shoes rise to know. And this the right soul is adopting the Smart City technologies to bring changes to services in a close relate to the citizens lives. Air Quality, transportation, parking, safety, disaster response and warfare. Smart City solutions should be including city oriented values, like the convenient transportation and clean environment, going hand in hand with people lives. Smart City Seoul's collect stores and analyzes all the city related data and make it public so that the citizens can make the best use out of it. For example, we have built an integrated data sharing platform, which shares all the ordinary straight of data and urban data has also sold Smart City platform or large scale dashboard presents such data in a single view, keeping better access and use of informations. Another example is democrats saw an online platform where the citizens people's their ideas, your PC, or cell phones and design on the polls, and they can discuss debate, and then then they can vote. And so the thought that sports and government are allocating the budget for them, so I can safely say that soul is number one democratic city where the leaders can determine their destinies. More of our lives are moving online, and this will accelerate further down the road. Therefore, smart cities should not overlook the under privileged and should be enjoyed by everyone as basic human rights. The city of Seoul capitalizes on innovative technologies to build the smart infrastructure and lay the institutional foundation to make our Smart City more sustainable. In an effort to bridge the digital divide, and guarantee this wise we are providing free Wi Fi networks in public areas, and this will expand throughout the entire city. So I promised last year to make every citizens can enjoy the free world fi everywhere within the soul in the era of revenue changes that were unheard of the past. Smart Cities can and will provide the values and opportunities to citizens and businesses. Smart Cities can grow and advance further when connected and converged. That is why cities, businesses and citizens from all around the world should join hands together. We need friends who can dream of things that never existed before. Thank you, everyone. So please join us in our touring to make changes and for the Smart City and smart world. Thank you very much.

 
Speaker 

Ladies and gentlemen, and please welcome a reality of smart city development panel. That was pretty cool.

 
Damon Embling 

everybody and thank you very much indeed to my part there from Seoul for your opening remarks really setting the context for our discussions this afternoon. My name is Damon Embling my day job is a journalist with a TV channel Euronews where media partner here at CES and it's a great pleasure to be here this afternoon to moderate what promises to be a fascinating and lively discussion. I think As you know, smart cities is a massive growing industry. Lots of new technologies are being deployed. And it's something really that affects all of us. It's going to touch all of our lives in some way. And towards the end of the session, probably the last 10 or 15 minutes or so. But allow some time for some questions from the audience. Hope you've got lots of questions in your mind to ask the panel here this afternoon. We've got a microphone there, and another one over here. So don't be shy, step up to the mic a bit later, and we can get your questions to the panel. So let me introduce the great panel I have alongside me here. We have mare park on the end there as you know, next to him is Laura shoe, who's the co founder and CEO streetlight data. You're a mobility data cruncher basically, aren't you? alongside Laura, we have Tom pay an auto by Soria, we have

  
Damon Embling 

the chief executive of the Royal Society for blind children, Tom pay, as I say yes chairman of way map and wayfinder product as well thank you very much indeed for joining us and And last but not least, we have our Omar Khan, who's the chief product officer with Magic Leap of spatial computing specialist, aren't you? Thank you very much indeed everybody, indeed for joining us this afternoon. Laura, let me just start with you when we talk of smart cities, and this has been a concept that's been around for a long time now, it's a lot of it. It's been talked about in various different forms. That's your definition of a small city.

 
Laura Schewel 

That's a hard one. I think that to me, to break it down to the fundamentals of smart city is one who's deploying limited resources in a reasonably intelligent way for to balance against a lot of complex competing priorities. So for example, it doesn't mean the city that has the most cutting edge technology, it means the city that's taking what it's had, what it has, whether that be data finances, real estate, and deploying it in the most efficient way possible.

 
Damon Embling 

Mayor Park, you were talking there about some Seoul's vision for small cities. What's your definition of a smart city? Why is it something you want to embrace in Seoul

 
Won Soon Park 

when we talk about the smart cities? So we should remind that for whom it developed? Yeah. So, you know, as mayor of Seoul, I'm always focusing on how we can make this city citizen oriented, citizen centered city. So I think it's the main topic and our destination for smart cities, human oriented, citizen centered.

 
Damon Embling 

And that some a key thing I think, and it's a key theme that's been coming through here at CES that I've heard that all this new technology, all of this innovation, maybe sometimes we're losing track of the consumer, the people that sort of had the end benefit, and that's a really important theme. That's coming out this afternoon. And, Tom now you're from the UK. You work in inclusion boosting inclusion And one of the things that you're looking at right now is that audio navigation for people with disabilities visually impaired, when so when we talk about really putting the people at the center of this, this technology, the smart cities, how important is it for you?

 
Tom Pey 

Well, I mean, really important. The first thing is that, you know, as Amir said, smart cities have to work for people. Part of the problem that we have with current city development is that it doesn't work for everyone equally. Where the development that we're doing is about helping people to get around using data that everybody else who doesn't have a disability generates to help those who have disabilities to be able to navigate in an intelligent and safe way. It's really for me, smart cities are all about well being. It's about me knowing that I can go out and enjoy the city. I can work in the city and get home like everybody Yes and and function in my home

 
Damon Embling 

in terms of the world that you've been doing developing audio navigation specifically, just tell us about that where that came from that idea and really where you're taking them.

 
Tom Pey 

Okay. Yeah, I mean, it's very interesting. Myself and another guy, we were both blind. And we're pretty much fed up. But, you know, we didn't have Google Maps at the time. So you can figure out how far back it was. We were reading a newspaper article about test goes to the supermarket chain, and they wanted to have a store with no people in it. And they were thinking of using RFID tagging on, you know, on their products and you put it in your basket and you walk up to the checkout, it scans it tells you how much you owe, and you walk out. And we thought, Well, you know, if we can get enough packs of Iceberg lettuce and put them in a row, then blind people could follow them like breadcrumbs. So we we did experiments with RFID and I really We really worked, it was great. We put seven blind people walking down Oxford Street busy State Street in London down into an underground station and back. And we didn't lose anybody. So it was an absolute successful Expo. And the problem was that you had to have a rucksack with a computer in it in a thing like a bent coat hanger sticking out at the back. And you had a gyroscope on the front that made you look like a ninja turtle. But I guess it was in fashion at the time. It's not nagging. But now we've we've taken that technology and with the help of fusion algorithms have put it into a mobile phone so that we can locate locate people against a map to one meter of accuracy, pretty much one step accuracy. And that has enormous benefits for people with disabilities. But more importantly, it has enormous benefit within the city for connecting With things and places,

 
Damon Embling 

so really important tool that could form a big part of smart cities in the future. In terms of technology for smart cities, obviously, we're seeing the rollout of 5g now, which brings all sorts of new opportunities. Where is technology taking this smart city vision? Do you think?

 
Omar Khan 

Yeah, I think I'm glad to hear my fellow fellow panelists talking about citizen centric cities being you know, the primary definition or filter of what is a smart city, and we are building technology and service of humanity. And if technology does not serve us and amplify our lives, then then obviously we're doing the wrong thing. So where we are from a technology perspective on smart cities, smart cities is it is bringing the digital and physical world together. There's a tremendous amount of value in the digital world, whether it's, you know, traffic data, whether it's, you know, population data, weather information, wind patterns, a tremendous amount of longitudinal data that we've got and collected and experiences that have been developed. But it's disintermediated from the physical world, you know, we always have to go back to a screen to, you know, to consume it. And so the ability for us to bring that content that experience that data, and merge it with the physical world. So it's available to us contextually when we need it. So I can add value, we were talking about this in the green room a little bit earlier, data. without context data with the without the ability to make it make actionable decisions on a real time basis, is actually completely useless, you know, and there's petabytes of it, if not more, and the ability for us to start to visualize visualize that data on top of the digital twin of Sol, or Los Angeles or Las Vegas and then be able to make decisions, both during the planning stages, as well as during the operational stages of the city and to help improve the life of the humans and people who live in that city but also start to break the boundaries of time and space because, you know, so let's use as an example, I had a chance to spend, you know, quite a bit of time in Seoul during my days at Samsung. One of the most Amazing cities in the world but soul should be a city for global citizens I should be able to partake in events in and and the the cultural capabilities and the cultural things that soul has to offer if I'm sitting here in Las Vegas and so technology when we start to MIT merge the digital physical worlds together I can be co present in places like Seoul, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and there's 200,000 people attending CES because of physical limitations or and or economic limitations there's no reason to million people shouldn't be able to attend and experience it not just on a screen but experience at volumetrically or at scale the way they would if they physically attended now there's never replacing it. So being somewhere you know, in the same room with you know, as better if we can get pretty close to it. That'd be ideal.

 
Damon Embling 

Now, you mentioned transport briefly in the start of your answer there, Laura, you crunch data over mobility, improving traffic flows, mobility, all that sorts of things. This is going to be a key focus right as smart citizen already is a key focus in smart cities. What what kind of things are you working on? What are you saying

 
Laura Schewel 

check So I think one of the reasons transportation is a key focus of smart cities is because it's been one of the dumbest industries up till now, transportation, just as an example, transportation is the largest single source of carbon emissions from the United States as of two years ago, soon it will be the largest source of carbon emissions in the world, all of us spend an inordinate amount of our lives doing transportation, which is probably not the thing we actually want to be doing. And yet, it has been an extraordinarily unmeasured part of our economy, we make in the US trillions of dollars of infrastructure decisions, based on a survey that was done nine years ago that got to like maybe 50,000 households. So what we fundamentally been working on is drastically increasing the understanding of transportation behavior. So if we make a decision, like put in a bike lane that will last 30 years, we put it in the right place. And so it seems like a very simple act, but infrastructure decisions last decades, and they deserve the most data driven smartest implementations. So Here's a cool example. We're working with several hundred different cities right now. But one reason cool case study was in Toronto, Toronto, if you all have been there recently has done an amazing job downtown have sidewalks and trans and bike lanes, but they haven't really seen car driving go down. And they had a hypothesis that the reason was that everyone who works in shops in downtown Toronto, most of them have to live in the other cities and towns like 20 minutes away. So if you drive your car to work every day, the odds that you'll then take the bus somewhere within the city go down. So they tested that hypothesis by working with our data, which takes advantage in a privacy appropriate manner of the millions of smartphones and connected cars and said, yeah, that's exactly what's happened. We confirmed a hypothesis. And these four towns you know, in the northwest are where a lot of that is coming from. So let's build some mobility hubs, some transit backbones, connecting the downtown of Toronto to these places which are drawing our commuters and we could only afford four and we built them in the right four places because we were data driven and smart about it. Man Park Yeah,

 
Won Soon Park 

actually trying to spin a key focus for you as well. And I'll give you a good example in terms of transportation. So, you know, in saw were originally a nighttime, the public transportation has stopped, I mean, including the subway or public purse. So one university student appeared, complained about it. So I accepted the idea. And you know, we analyzed around 30 billion Pong cores, where the citizens are so many gathered at nighttime and where is their homes. So all these big data were analyzed, and then we designed

 
Tom Pey 

nine light lines

 
Won Soon Park 

operating from afternoon to 5am Exactly right. It's the early success. Good news for the citizens to connect to move them in a nightline nighttimes. So it is the reason why I'm saying the citizen centered is the essence of smart city. Yeah.

 
Damon Embling 

So all of this can improve our mobility getting around our city's transportation. But Tom, I mean, you have an office in London, you know what it's like getting around London on the best of the haze, it can take several hours to get anywhere in a car and you get crunched into a subway like a sardine. And I'm pleasing London as an example, because we have quite an old infrastructure there. It's all right, having all this data, all these new technologies, but maybe it's gonna be difficult in some cities to actually introduce these improvements.

 
Tom Pey 

I don't if a city if so can do it anywhere can do it. You know, the UK is the fifth largest economy in the world. And it needs to take care of its citizens if it doesn't want to be left behind. Hi, I think one of the great encouraging things about cities like Seoul and and Vancouver is those that are that are advancing in this smart city space is that they have rules around it to take care of the most vulnerable in their society. However, if you walk around CES and you look at the driverless cars and the technology that's emerging, they're not advertising the fact that these cars could be used by people with features that and they've got special buttons in them for people who are deaf. You know, none of these things seem important to the marketing effort. That causes me some discomfort, because I think if paper don't solve the totality of problems for everybody in a smart city, then the funder would be really left behind because of you know, the the ability to move around and to interact for be so quick

 
Damon Embling 

Do you think inclusion is being tackled enough? No.

 
Tom Pey 

I work on a group with the United Nations, they're really, really concerned about the development of technology. And what they're doing is they did a scan of all patrons to see what patrons have built inclusion into them, and where they happened, and they want to at least produce a report to help those that are developers and inventors to make sure that the most vulnerable are taken care of not the most vulnerable, necessarily be a blind person, somebody with say, mild dementia, they would be locked in their home because they can't go out. You know, whereas with simple age built into the city, they could get be reminded for the wall or if they got lost that could be found very quickly. Yeah. So there's lots of things that have to be thought about that need to be put to the top of The agenda. I know soul is a leader in this. I mean, you have to be applauded for it. And I think most cities have got to sit down and look at this vulnerability in a smart city is a very, very serious condition.

 
Damon Embling 

And your line of work Omar and your specialism and how much do you think about inclusion and actually thinking, how is this going to benefit all communities?

 
Omar Khan 

Absolutely. It's at the core of what we do when we think about amplifying humans. It's also about breaking down, you know, it's about accessibility. It's about, you know, it is about inclusion, but it's about, you know, access to health care, it's about access to experts, it's about access to education, there's so many things that are that are artificially, you know, divided by boundaries of borders. And in, in when we think in the socio economic impacts to in terms of access, and so one that one of the, one of the many features of the technology that we're talking about, and we're working with cities to deployed as well as with educational systems is how do we start to provide broader access? So that if you need health care, and you're you're somewhere in Sub Saharan Africa, and the infectious disease expert is somewhere in New York, you know, how do you get that same access to health care? How do you break that boundary of time and space, same thing for education in the inner city. And so the ability for the best teachers, the best professors to have the ability to reach audiences. And it actually goes back to the point of transportation and logistics as well, because I mean, I think the couple points that were were that were just made, is that if we decide we don't always need to get on the road and go somebody somewhere, our co presence platform that we're that we're working on is meant to make sure that we have access to the things that we need them when we need them, without having to necessarily fly there. We've worked with a partner as an example in Paris, BNP Paribas, their real estate division, and one of their goals was to reduce their carbon footprint and they Got these large real estate projects and commercial real estate projects coming out of the ground that got clients from all over the world that they're trying to engage without having to get on a plane? How can they take a tour of that facility? How can they meet the other tenants that are considering that that location? How do they also reduce the carbon footprint of their employees having to travel and meet these clients all over the world, and they put that into practice. And so our ability to attack obviously, you know, from a smart city perspective is is to you know, whether it's taking advantage of the data the instrumentation visualization, operations management layers, but also reducing the traffic and reducing the carbon footprint when it when its economic when it when it makes sense. And that's one of the one of the other benefits of the technology that we're working on. I just wanted to make a just a very quick point on the piggyback something Laura and and Mayor Parker talking about. A lot of these decisions are made point in time. And the key is when we make when we're trying to involve transportation logistics systems or anything, you know that that is driven by longitudinal data, they have to be dynamic. We, we have to be able to involved in very, very quickly. So as we're visualizing the data that we're getting, and I think Laura is probably the resident expert on the stage on this, our ability to react to that and make changes and build systems that are dynamic to be able to respond to the needs of the citizens. And the bus route could be a great example, does the bus need to necessarily stop every single time? And and does it does the route need to be exactly the same every single night for that same bus? It doesn't. But do we have the data and the actionable data necessary to make those decisions on a real time basis to be able to optimize? And the answer is, yes, we have the data, but can we make it actionable? That's the work that needs to be done.

 
Damon Embling 

Really lower the technology and the Smart City concepts. It really is redefining city life if we look at that, but who cares? I mean, what's in it for us if I live in a city and what's in it for the local government, maybe can even provide local services with the money that they've already got.

 
Laura Schewel 

It's a good question. I think that you get into this very difficult conversation where different actors have different goals. And depending on who's paying for those Smart City systems that will affect what the outcome is who's paying right now, not enough people as a vendor, I would have to say, but more seriously. So if if the if the goal is to say reduce traffic jams, right to make it easier and smoother to drive around, that would achieve most people believe a goal of better economic development because you could have better flow of people and goods. However, it would not achieve a climate goal. In fact, it probably make carbon emissions from that city worse. In addition, if it meant that transit never got funded, it would make transit and all the wonderful social commuting that happens in shared transit worse. So if you have the traffic authority, paying for the Smart City data, it'll probably push in one direction. I think that in many ways, city You need to pay for it themselves. Because then they can represent the goals of the citizenry. We see a trend right now where cities are being sold this idea by Big Data companies, not us. But other ones that if the city pushes all this data up into the cloud value will just emerge and data is the new oil, and it will be worth so much and maybe a new revenue stream. I think this this this story is really overstated. And I think that if you're talking about data monetization, fundamentally, we're always talking about advertising. And if we fund the Smart City on an advertising backbone, I don't think we're going to get the things we want out of it. So I do think that we have to keep doing the very hard work of getting funding to the cities so that they can pay for most a lot of their own Smart City infrastructure and be able to say from a citizen driven perspective, how the private players come in

 
Damon Embling 

their Park, how are you funding the changes in Seoul and I guess the end of the day is This also comes down to political supports as well.

 
Won Soon Park 

So, many developments can happen with the you know, cooperative ecosystems with public and private sectors, you know, the many inventions and technological developments are being made by private sectors companies, but the local government can, you know, provide some incentives for the new technology developments for example, you know, we try to make the science more inclusive, but the force, revolution Industrial Revolution development are, you know making sometimes began and source divide these two keep divided but same time you know providing some support the startup enterprises to, you know, bridge the gap divide. So installed, there are so many small and young startups who are trying to make some, you know, technology to support to the disabled. I think it's really great. So is beyond the cost and expenditures, some short

 
Damon Embling 

term you you obviously, as I said before working on this audio navigation system for inclusivity. But you've hit some stumbling blocks, haven't you? Because it's a great idea, but the infrastructure isn't really there is it?

 
Tom Pey 

No. And actually, the bigger point we have to remember and learn the lesson from the last Industrial Revolution, that we don't leave part of the population behind us this time around and We're at the beginning of the road of this particular technical revolution. And right at this point in time, we need to build in some rules and regulations, so that public funding and infrastructure funding and venture capital funding will only go to projects that include and work for everybody. If we don't put the blocker in our front, then the designers are going to design for profit only. Yeah. There shouldn't be a, you know, one shouldn't preclude the other. And in our particular case, yeah, I mean, the, you run up against many, many regulations and blocks. Thank thankfully, we've worked with the CTA here, and a number of people that were interested and for the first time we put in an inclusion requirement of front into audio into navigation, indoor navigation. Yeah. So anybody who wants to provide an indoor navigation system in the United States should not comply with the CTA standard. And that has been adopted by a number of cities. And now looking at that particular standard and saying, Yeah, I mean, it should work for blind people to work for people who are influencers and work people who are actually in London, it will work for Japanese tourists who cannot read our English signs if they're right. So I think it's, it's, it's brilliant, but we have to look at standards and use the standards as the method of judging societal value. For all of it's

 
Laura Schewel 

just a great example of that we sell software to government, and recently the state of Minnesota and others have adopted a standard for software vendors to the government so that the software must be usable by people with low vision and usable by people who cannot hear in a variety of different ways that makes software accessible. For people with different disabilities, and we would, as a result of working with the state and wanting to sell to the state, we have now changed our whole software to be compliant with those standards, which is not what we would have spent our money on first as a small company. So it's a great example of the power of government who has not just the profit motive to really direct the way things have all

 
Tom Pey 

meant, if I can just add one thing, the data that comes out of what you do, will drive political decisions, right? That data should have built into it routes that do not mean that any solution that might be arrived that would preclude a citizen on the basis of their disability or vulnerability. If that can be built in, then the decisions that are taking they're going to be in the interests of everybody.

 
Damon Embling 

So Mr. We're talking there about the regulations, the standards, the collection of all this data,

 
Won Soon Park 

actually

 
Damon Embling 

part of the standards and the regulation should be about my privacy, your privacy, everybody else's privacy across many places in the world. Including in Europe right now there are massive privacy concerns. technology these days is seemingly collecting more and more and more and more data about us. questions are being asked about whether it's really, really being used in the right way how we're taking advantage of it. But how do you reassure people that are very pessimistic that tech companies are just creating this tech for money, and actually, they didn't care about our previous

 
Omar Khan 

two minutes. And by the way, I'll even add more to the to the problem, which is it's an incredibly personal set of data. It's going to be increasingly more personal, especially when we, you know, start to use the type of services that we're talking about. And yet magically, we made a very early stage your data belongs to you and you decide, you know, whom you want to share it with how you want to share it for me and you should belong to it. I mean, you should benefit from the the sharing of that data. We call it live stream from a platform perspective that you own your live stream. You decide how you want to parse your live stream, you decide how you want to share your live stream and you it doesn't belong to an ad network, that it should not be monetized on an on a CPC or CPM basis. You should should understand the value of that information if it's your health data, and I want to pursue my health data and share it with my physician, because I get direct benefit from that. From that information that I've collected over time, and the health care that I'm getting is better, therefore the cost is going down in terms of delivery. Of that healthcare. That's, that's direct benefit to me. And I'm the one involved in information exchange, I think foundationally when we think about deploying a smart city, what we have to do is, you know, because part of the disruption comes from the service delivery model, so when we, when we build, build a dynamic digital twin, local, continue forward with soul of soul, and we make soul a dynamic digital, kind of underlying layer, and then we start to deploy services on top of that, that multiple service providers as well as the citizens of soul have access to it's the exchange of that value that that we're the monetization can come from, because in one of the examples that that we're working on today, you know, Japan, we're working actively. But one of the biggest issues that was posed to us was the population is aging and the access to health care in Japan, people can't you know, they can't get to the hospital when they need to, they can't get the physicians or medical providers when they need to. So can we allow that healthcare delivery to occur within a smart city or a smart country type of environment when they need it, and how they need it. And so the economic value that gets created from the inefficiencies that are voided by healthcare delivery happening on a remote basis, but not just telemedicine, or video medicine, but but spatial delivery of medicine, a consultation, the access to data that that that person has shared that says, I have been collecting this incredibly personal set of information that is relevant to me, I'm sharing with you my health care provider or halfway across the country. And I'm benefiting directly from sharing that data with you. And the waste is removed in the system as well during that because in the end advertising business models are their high spray business models, right your spring and very wide net, to gain a very, very small return. Therefore, there's a high level of inefficiency in it. So that incredibly personalized data, set it in the hands of the user that owns it, sharing it when they need it, they're making an active decision to benefit from sharing that data. And that's has to be a very important principle in terms of how we operate these. I think one of the biggest challenges that, you know, it's a little bit tangential that is being raised by the panelists here today is that as we start to build platforms for smart cities, they're going to be incredibly siloed. And it's really incumbent from an infrastructure provider perspective for us to build a unifying layer a middleware, we call that magic verse, which is how do you bring disparate data sets of transportation data, utility data, wireless technology and signal data together in a way that it's then from an API perspective, being able to be open to multiple providers and customers and citizens in a way that it's actually usable and scalable because what's happening today, even in a small and environment like a stadium, right, which you would think is actually fairly manageable. But it's not we've had Stadium, you know, sort of owners and operators come to us and say, we've got one person that's managing the sensors, they have a different interface on the web. We've got somebody else that's managing these sensors in this data, I got a coke open a completely different webpage, amplify that to a city level amplified. That's what country level. So the disparate number of sensors and IoT input data and then the number of interfaces necessary to manage that and then make it actionable. It's a it's a multiplicative or exponential problem that we got to make sure at the foundational layer we address and that's a responsible from an almost akin to a highway, a transportation a utility system. Then once that's done now, you can open it up from, you know, from an API perspective to health care providers, educational providers, entertainment companies, and then it becomes a service that can be you know, directly monetized by service delivery.

 
Won Soon Park 

So yeah, opening up the data set, and So, you know, the sharing the information is the best way to satisfy the citizens rights to these tours and also providing a good chance opportunity for businesses. And so much for this government is making it a rule to disclose every document a petition to citizens. We transformed the principle of positive to negative I mean, without some except of privacy issues, we are disclosing every status and informations and also I think you know, we are discussing the some gap between the citizens but same time, I would like to point out to gap is becoming bigger during the series. Two Cities, I mean, many cities are trying to be a smart city, but many of them have not much resources to follow it. So in this sense, so Metropolitan Government that is fairly established, we go, which is the Association of, you know, smart cities, and we have already 140 members, member cities, so, you know, providing very good best practices or sometimes funding to develop the smart cities and so, so I think these kinds of international network and cooperation is very awesome in future. Nora is

 
Damon Embling 

smart cities just a gimmick.

 
Laura Schewel 

I think the the buzzword is basically used. I hope it's not a gimmick, but what I think is happening. is the term smart cities is used to get people excited. And to make it get a headline in the newspaper or make, you know, some elected officials want to show up to do something that probably we should have done in the first place. And that's not a gimmick. That's that's good packaging and marketing. And I'm totally fine with that as a way to get started. And I do think, interestingly, on the privacy angle, you mentioned in the EU concern that the tech companies would use the data incorrectly. I think there's some regional differences. I think, in the US, we see that concern, but we also see the concern that the government would use the data incorrectly. And that's where we've seen some of the biggest pushback, there's a big brouhaha brewing in San Diego right now because of a pretty cool Smart City idea that used video cameras and didn't properly or didn't enough, maybe let the city know what was going to be happening and all of a sudden these video cameras have been used to identify suspects and crimes. And all the sudden you have cities saying wait, you said this was smart cities. Really you just got cameras so you can profile people And then arrest them for crimes. Yeah. So we, the privacy conversation is not going to be the same in different parts of the globe, which is which is interesting to watch and may challenge some of these ways that we share best practices. Okay,

 
Damon Embling 

great stuff. Thanks very much. Well, let's open the floor to the audience. Who's got a question? Okay. We tried to step up to the microphone just to your right. If you just tell us who you are and who your questions for and then, obviously what your question is. Thank you.

 
Speaker 

Hello, my name is Marcus Harvey representing secure apps. had a question for the mere How are you tackling the challenges cyber attacks? If you look at like Norland, they just got hacked. As your city gathers more data, how are you protecting yourself from that?

 
Won Soon Park 

You know, it's serious pones you know, because so many information date has entered in one You know, space. So if it's attacked, it may be Yeah, no big catastrophe for every cities. So we have very secured center Control Center to make more pillowcase from the tech. So it is, but I think it's not enough we are always be very careful to defend from the attacks. So in that sense also we need some more advanced technologies. So if you have anything please look so can be very eager to be testbed, please.

 
Laura Schewel 

Thank there's also training the New Orleans attack and Colorado State of Colorado and several of the other ransom wires were based on lack of training in staff which is increasingly becoming clear that that's the weakest link. Right. It's it's spoofing and human error. So I think there's a big Smart City employee security education thing, not just technology,

 
Damon Embling 

because the taxi market could have wide ranging consequences in a smart city, everything connected up all this data in one place.

 
Omar Khan 

Yeah, data shouldn't necessarily be in one place. It should be a distributed architecture. It should be, you know, whether it's blockchain or if somebody

 
Damon Embling 

wants to call some damage that could bring down some infrastructure, right.

 
Omar Khan 

I mean, that's, that's the risk today, that that's happening, right. So that there is an incumbent. There, we have to secure the data, we have to secure it in a way where it's not necessarily all about one time to one attack. It's got to be distributed in a way and it's got to be blocked, whether it's blockchain and distributed from a key perspective, there's a lot of different architectural choices that have to be made, and that can be made and continue to be innovated upon, to protect, protect the data so that we don't have these vulnerabilities. But I think, you know, Laura's, right. I mean, there's always that human element from a training perspective that we have to address.

 
Damon Embling 

Okay. Anybody else? Have a question? Raise your hand if you've got one over here Stuffed over to the microphone. just reminded just say who you are and who your questions for please. Okay.

 

Speaker 

Good afternoon. My name is Christopher Clark. I'm actually a mayor in the city of Harvey, Illinois, and maneuver mayor. And I've always been investigating smart cities. But what I found is that many of the cities in America are smaller cities. They're not the largest cities that have the data set sets that many industries need. So how does the small city slavers Harvey about 25,000 going into go into investing in smart cities where we don't necessarily have the capital resources to do so? And I based that question on what the mayor said, Because Smart Cities are supposed to be about the citizens. Then how do we serve the citizens of we don't have the necessary resources.

 
Won Soon Park 

Okay, we would like to pick that up.

 
Laura Schewel 

So first of all, I think that's an excellent question. You're absolutely correct. And it is incumbent on smart city vendors like us to have products that don't just work for Seoul in New York and London. And so we've been working very hard on that. And I think that's just for all the vendors in the room, I think that's important to really realize the promise. But also, we've seen cities coming together, sometimes under their Metropolitan Planning Organization or their state to buy as a group, which has financial benefits, but also has the benefits that Moorpark was talking about that if you have a collection of small cities who are all using the same tool, you can create a user group and you can start to share best practices. So that's we've also started regional user groups of the smaller agencies that use our software, because we've realized to really get where we want to go the small cities, there's just thousands more of them, and they absolutely have to be a part of it.

 
Damon Embling 

For me, the only thing to add to that one size doesn't fit all.

 
Tom Pey 

Yeah, I mean, we have found that in smaller towns, for instance, people want to Put in intensive technology, and it comes down to a capital base, but it actually doesn't have to cost a lot of money. I think it's like what you said, if a number of groups get together and share cost, and it works, and the rules are pretty much the same. So it is all about sharing resource among

 
Omar Khan 

Yeah, and I think when you think about it from a small city perspective, I mean, we this is one problem that we've been tackling. You know, when we think about our platform, magic first, which, you know, for us, it scales from a room level, it scales to a building level, it scales to a city block level, you know, and then city scale, country scale. And so you don't necessarily have you can break the problem up in terms of not trying to tackle it all at one point, right. So let's say you're a small setting, you just want to tackle the educational system and and make that smarter so that you're you're gaining the access, gaining the benefits of bringing, bringing the digital and physical together from a from an educational perspective, how do you take a small city and start to connect that together? school districts around the country or the universities around the country in a way where you can start to benefit very specifically for the citizens of Harvey, from an educational access perspective, or it could be a health care where you tie it to Cook County in Chicago and say we want to build a link between Cook County and Harvey in a way where the were the physicians and the capability that exists in Cook County or in Chicago, are available to the citizens of Harvard without making the trek over to Chicago for an issue. So breaking down the problem and saying, we're going to start to approach smart and this goes back to your first question, which is what is the definition of a smart city, it's about improving the life, the longevity, the health to happiness of your citizens. And that doesn't necessarily all have to come from sensors and cameras and an autonomous driving it comes from improving. It comes from improving the life of the humans and the people that live in the city. And that can you can break that down into very, very small problems in terms of, you know, whether it's training of your workforce and making them more flexible over time. So the perform more task. That's about improving educational access, healthcare access. And that doesn't all have to be incumbent responsibility on the city itself. It's about connecting a consortium of cities, or you know, school districts or healthcare systems. So find a problem that you think makes the biggest impact to your city. And then try to figure out how to amplify that or solve that and start to build from there because I think the economic value will then start to start to really pay back

 
Laura Schewel 

after think not calling it a smart city investment could be useful. That's like if you can tie it to budget that you have for something that's more boring and prosaic and that the budget is always there for a year, like pothole improvements. Or, you know, there's been success in tying this to mandates from the feds about Vision Zero and reducing cycling and pedestrian deaths. So sometimes calling it smart cities is not the best.

 
Won Soon Park 

Okay, any other questions? Okay.

 
Damon Embling 

The district will go first. What promise who comes next?

 
Speaker 

Okay, like Yes, my name is Peter and this is for anyone. So when I think of inclusiveness, I think of the homeless population and I wonder about ideas for smart cities helping them I love the idea of the Wi Fi for everyone but doubt that a number of the homeless would have the ability to even access to free Wi Fi.

 
Tom Pey 

Yeah. One of the big the biggest barriers to inclusion actually is not disability is poverty. And, and homeless people could, people who poverty don't necessarily have to be homeless, are going to find it very difficult to connect. If you don't have $1,000 smartphone, are you going to be able to use the smart city? That's going to be a big, big question. So you know, the, the searches on for the type of sensors that can be used to help me if I'm homeless, or if, if I'm not, how do I have a wearable that doesn't cost the that allows the authorities to identify that I'm actually a homeless person. sleeping out in sub zero temperatures, and that they can then send a service to me, rather than me having to try and eke out a service someplace. Again, it's a bit like what was said about bringing education services. To me. Bringing homeless services to me, is going to be as important as allowing disabled people to get to the services they want.

 
Damon Embling 

My Park is really important this question, isn't it the accessibility to technology, the inclusivity because it's not just about the expensive technology, if you will be able to have it in their pocket, their smartphone or whatever. But it's also Isn't it about city residents really understanding what it actually is and how it benefits their lives? How do you sell it to residents?

 
Won Soon Park 

Actually, just a few for Tom mentioned the homeless. So recently, I had the ability to sell shelters and some streets because this is very harsh winter season in Korea. And so, I found that they are using many of them are using the cell phones. So, you know, having cell phones is the symbolics because, you know, it means without cell phones in these days, you know, it's disconnected from the social network. So, I think you're providing and some training, to be still connected with their own families or citizens, it's very much important. And so, so, Metropolitan Government, providing some, you know, opportunities to, to be connected with the other citizens and also to be trained to go back to their life is very important. So, you know, each according to each different, you know, sectors, the city governments should put protected guarantee access to the

 
Damon Embling 

running out of time. We're just going to take this final question from the gentleman that put his hand up here. Sorry to

 
Speaker 

everyone. My name is Robert. Speaking of boring I St. Cleaning software business and looking to improve safety with that. So my question is actually specifically for Laura, and maybe a Mars well, funding and policy or large barriers. And when the mayor of Harvey was up here talking about funding for small cities or regions, I'm just curious, is it feasible to think about subscription model? Obviously, there's maintenance fees, and so on, so forth. I'm just curious to see what you guys think. And if we could start with Lauren,

 
Damon Embling 

okay. Actually, we've just got time for Laura. So if you can answer this

 
Laura Schewel 

quickly. I think there has to be otherwise no one can ever afford it. But that's a big there's a big education. barrier and the procurement departments in the North America where I know more about what it means to buy a subscription. So we sell Software as a Service, a subscription, which is one of the reasons Our services are so much cheaper than using old fashioned data collection. But there are agencies we sell to that don't have that category in their accounting system of what a software subscription would be. So I think I think there is room and we're we are in the five years I've been selling this I am seeing a shift, but it requires deep education in procurement, which I think always gets left out of the innovation conversation. That's the biggest leverage place to innovate right now, I think in smart cities.

 
Damon Embling 

Okay. Thank you very much. Sorry, we've had to make a brief answer that, um, let's have some final closing thoughts. You got 30 seconds each, I'm afraid. Omar, let's start with you. What needs to happen next to make smart cities a real reality.

 
Omar Khan 

Well, I think you know, we're definitely needs to happen next is defining what each city or government wants to tackle, right because it's boiling. The ocean is Not going to work here. So people need to figure out what what what what is the problem from a sequence perspective they want to tackle and start to look at it from something that they can actually achieve in the near term, I had the goals of, of Improving life for their citizens. So because these words are so, so intimidating, and they're incredibly inconsistent from how they're defined, and so breaking down the problem into into a set of goals that are targeted at their citizens, or the folks that reside in those cities, and then start to sequence them in something that they can tackle.

 
Damon Embling 

I was 55 seconds for me about five seconds. Now. Firstly,

 
Tom Pey 

I'm going to be slightly off the wall here. Okay. You know, I think that, you know, we've got an opportunity now to look at data is data owned by individuals, or could it be owned by communities, rather than by the, by the big tech companies? And is there a way that data could be monetized for the benefit of cities and its communities?

 
Won Soon Park 

Right. 32nd month out, right? challenges on

 
Laura Schewel 

Yes. So I think the most important thing we need to do next is start putting up concrete specific case studies of how smart city is working. Mayor parks example of using cell phone data as the justification for keeping the buses open Later, we'll get more people excited in behind Smart Cities than any big picture concept speech ever would.

 
Damon Embling 

Okay, great final words from you,

 
Won Soon Park 

as leading Smart City, so is ready to accept any kinds of proposals. And, you know, so we are really trying to be the number one test by the city. Please come to Seoul and a proposal and they pick success. So right.

 
Damon Embling 

Thank you very much indeed everybody for attending. Enjoy the rest of the show. Thanks for coming.

CTATECH-PROD1